• Verbs: Subjunctive Mood, Transitive Verbs, Participles

     

    Pre-Assessment

    Terms:

    Write an original sentence in the indicative mood.

    Write an original sentence in the imperative.

    Write an original sentence in the subjunctive mood. 

    Write an original sentence with a transitive verb.

    Write an original sentence with an intransitive verb.

    Write an original sentence with a past participle. 

    Write an original sentence with a present participle. 

    Circle the verbs in the following sentence: The burning building was stinking like smoked ham and burnt toast, but the circling of the fire department helicopters gave us hope. 

     

    Usage: 

    1. If the following sentences are grammatically correct, write "OK" beside them. If you see an error, fix it. 

    • I saw something today that really annoyed me.
    • Sit down. Be humble.
    • If I was the teacher, we'd have class outside every day.
    • I suggest that she implements a budget cut in March.
    • I rise my body out of bed.
    • Lie your head on the pillow and close your eyes. 

    2. Write a sentence that uses an -ing word as 3 different parts of speech.

    3. Write a sentence that uses an -ed word as 2 different parts of speech. 

     

     

     

     

    Instruction

    For English moods, look here.  For the subjunctive mood, look here

    “Subjunctive Mood” (if I were… I would). When fantasizing or considering the future, “If I was” is wrong; you must say “If I were” (“If I were a millionaire, I would…”). The only time “If I was” is right is when considering the real life past: “If I was awake another ten minutes that night, I would have seen the U.F.O.”). So: if you can follow it with “I would/could (do),” you need to use “If I were.”  Also, if you say "I suggest/recommend that he/she ________," the verb will not have an s at the end: "I reccommend that he take a chill pill."

    4.      “Transitive” Verbs require a direct object. (“I kicked” doesn’t sound complete without an object: what did I kick? “I kicked the ball.”) Some verbs can be either transitive or not: When you say, “I ate,” ate is intransitive; when you say “I ate dinner,” ate is transitive. Consider “transitive” just a new vocab word, but sometimes people make the mistake of using an transitive verb with a direct object afterwards ("I lie my head down." You can say "I lie down" or "I lay my head down" because "lie" is intransitive and "lay" is transitive).

    5.      *Verbals: Participle, Infinitive, Gerund. More vocab: When forms of verbs are used as nouns or adjectives, they get new names. As a group, all verbs used in other ways are called verbals. When a verb is used as an adjective, it is called a “participle.” A “present participle” is the –ing form (“Burning Man”). A “past participle” is the –ed form (“burned paper”). The rest is review from Nouns, #4: verbs used as nouns are called “gerunds” (“Wrestling is my sport.”); the “to + the root” form of the verb is known as the “infinitive,” and can be used as a noun.  

     

    Assessment

    When ready, re-take the pre-test without looking at the instruction materials.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

Last Modified on August 11, 2017