• Contemporary Literature, Spring 2020

    Mr. Doherty (gdoherty@tamdistrict.org)

     

    Welcome to this semester-long class. We'll be assessing and building reading, writing and speaking skills while exploring literature published during your lifetime. Bookmark this page and the Home Access Center (eschool) so that you can easily check your homework and grades.  

     

    Bring

    Every class, please bring a pen or pencil, lined paper, the book we're reading (if there is one), and a thin binder in which you keep the handouts from the semester organized. You should be seated with your pen, paper and book out, ready to listen and participate, at the bell that starts class. Success will follow!

     

    Grades

    All work will be scored on 4-point scales, made available ahead of time when possible. I like these for their simplicity: 3 means you get it, 2 means you don't, quite. They are mostly built from the Common Core and TUHSD standards and language, but also factor in timeliness/lateness. These can be translated into percentage scores through normal math (3/4=75%). However, these percentages, as a semester average, translate into letter grades as follows:

     

    % Range  Grade 
    99-100  A+ 
    89-98.99   A
    85-88.99   A-
    80-84.99   B+
    75-79.99   B
    68-74.99   B-
    62-67.99   C+
     56-61.99   C
     50-55.99   C-
    47-49.99   D+
    44-46.99   D
     40-43.99   D-
     0-39.99   F

      

    In other words, 4= A+, 3=B, 2=C-, 1=F.  Note the difference with traditional scales: 75% is a B, not a C; 50% is a C-, not an F. How generous! Again, as far as standards go, 3 = adequately meets the standard, 2 = does not adequately meet the standard.

    Major writing assignments may be revised or redone for increased credit within a month of them being returned to you (but not after the semester ends).

      

    Rules on Late Work, Revisions and Extra Credit

    Late work: You may turn in missing assignments until the final exam for reduced credit. Work will not be accepted after your class’ final or during vacation or the next semester. Work up to a week late can get up to a 3. Work up to a month late can get up to a 2. Work over a month late can only get a 1. 

    Revised work: You may revise work that scored 3 or below for a higher score. Revisions will not erase late penalties. Work revised within 1 week of being returned to you can earn a maximum of a 3.5; work revised after that can earn a maximum of a 3 (so you are rewarded for doing it right the first time or at least revising it promptly). Revised work and extra credit are not accepted during the last two weeks of the semester (Dead Week and Finals Week).

    Extra Credit: You may boost your semester grade up to 5% with extra credit. See me for extra credit opportunities, or let me know if you have any ideas. Generally, if you want to read or write something that's not for another class and is not your work recycled from the past, I'll give you extra credit for it. If you are dishonest with extra credit (try to pass off something from another class, the past, or another writer/thinker for extra credit), you are banned from getting extra credit for the year. 

    The daily plans and homework are below. Links to readings are provided as a courtesy, but you are expected to track down all readings even if the link fails to work. 

     

    Cell Phones

    Cell phones will stored atop the ipad cart or deep in your bag during each class. You may ask permission to use them as necessary. Cell phones in use or in your possession without permission will be kept for the day in my room or the AP's office.  

     

    Chromebooks

    There is a class set of Chromebooks, which are sometimes useful. One will be assigned to you. Do not use anybody else's. You are responsible for yours during the class period. This includes returning it to its spot and plugging in its charger. If that's too much to ask of you, then borrowing it is too much to ask of me. If yours goes missing or gets broken during your class period, you will have to pay for it.

     

    Calendar

    The calendar for what homework is due at the beginning of each class, and what we'll do every class, is below. Links are provided as a courtesy, but if they don't work, it's up to you to find necessary material by googling or by asking me in person.  

     

     

    Instruction: Critical Essay (Book Review)Work time: Begin book review of novel of choice with introduction: author, title, synopsis (summary), and overall opinion expressed as a simile or metaphor (find 2-3 adjectives to describe the reading experience. think of something else, not a book or movie, that could share those adjectives. for example: "Reading about the violent racial injustices in this book is like drinking a pot of coffee: it makes you way more woke but also jittery and sick to your stomach." 

     Contemporary Lit Daily Schedule: Spring 2020
    Day, Date  Due at start of class (printed before)  Do in class Skills Emphasized 
    Wed 1/8

     (Monday schedule)

    We'll be reading a contemporary novel of choice, so you have the option of finding your own during break. It should be something published in your lifetime. You'll need to find one by next Tue/Wed. 

    Introductions as necessary; maybe a social game.

    Share break moments

    Syllabus/calendar

    If time: Write down break moments on paper by hand. Include 5 senses, thoughts and dialogue if possible.

     Descriptive writing
    Thurs, Fri 1/9-10  

     

    Doherty is absent today. The day's plan is here and printed as a handout. But here's the short version:

    Write down break moments on paper by hand. Include 5 senses, thoughts and dialogue if possible.

    Score, revise, share

    Visit library: get contemporary novel of choice. Read. 

     

    Descriptive writing

    contemporary novel selection

    Mon 1/13  

    Monday mechanics:  dangling modifiers

     dangling modifiers

    Tue, Wed
    1/14-15
    Find contemporary novel of choice to read if you didn't in library during class. 

    analysis: 

    • theme and message
    • plot support
    • quote that part
    • explain support 

    Instruction: CCQCs:

    • Claim: theme, writer's message about theme.
    • Context: summary of plot related to the message.
    • Quote: Best evidence from text of message. Incorporate it.
    • Commentary: explain how the plot event(s)/quote shows the message. 

    Read opinion pieces the opinion sections of Fox News, CNN, USA Today, or even buzzfeed. (Note that the claim is usually in the title.) Write an analytical CCQC about one: Op-ed CCQC. Discuss. 

    If time, read your novel of choice. Begin taking notes for a critical essay (book review). 

     

    Analysis

    CCQCs

     Thurs, Fri 
    1/16-17

    Find contemporary novel of choice to read by now. Start it. Bring it. You will have 4 weeks to read it, so figure out how much that is to reach each day and each week.

    Write Op-ed CCQC if you didn't finish in class.

    Show and tell: contemporary novel of choice

    Read short story: Clare Beams, "We Show What We Have Learned"  

    Identify theme, message.

    Write Fiction Analysis CCQC#1: claim (thesis), context (plot event summary as evidence), quote (writer's words, incorporated), commentary (explain how plot decision shows writer's theme/message.)

     Summary

    Analysis: thesis, CCQC

    Incorporating quotes

    Mon 1/20  (No School: MLK, Jr. Day)  

     

     

     Tues, Wed
    1/21-22

    Read contemporary novel of choice.

    Finish Fiction Analysis CCQC #1 (for "We Show What We Have Learned") if not finished in class 

    Read short story: George Saunders, "My Flamboyant Grandson"

    Write analysis thesis: theme and writer's message about theme. 

    Write Fiction Analysis CCQC #2: claim (thesis), context (plot event summary as evidence), quote (writer's words, incorporated), commentary (explain how plot decision shows writer's theme/message.)

    If time, read novel of choice

    Analysis: thesis, CCQC

    Incorporating quotes

    Thurs, Fri 
    1/23-24

    Read 1/4 of contemporary novel of choice by now. 

    Finish Fiction Analysis CCQC #2 (for "My Flamboyant Grandson") if not finished in class 

    Read short story: Neil Gaiman, "Orange" 

    Write analysis thesis: theme and writer's message about theme. 

    Write Fiction Analysis CCQC #3: claim (thesis), context (plot event summary as evidence), quote (writer's words, incorporated), commentary (explain how plot decision shows writer's theme/message.)

    If time, read novel of choice

    Analysis

     

    Mon 1/27 Read contemporary novel of choice.

     

    Monday mechanics: parentheses, brackets, ellipses

     

     Analysis 
     Tues, Wed
    1/28-29

    Read contemporary novel of choice.

    Finish Fiction Analysis CCQC #3 (for "Orange") if not finished in class 

    Read short story: K. Kvashay-Boyle, "Saint Chola"

    Write analysis thesis: theme and writer's message about theme. 

    Write Fiction Analysis CCQC #4: claim (thesis), context (plot event summary as evidence), quote (writer's words, incorporated), commentary (explain how plot decision shows writer's theme/message.)

    Choose what to do next class:

    • revise (or finish) previous work (break moment narration and 4 analysis CCQCs) and read novel of choice,
    • OR, for extra credit, expand 1 CCQC into a 4-5 paragraph analysis essay. 

    If time, read novel of choice or begin analysis essay. 

    Analysis: essay intro, sub-claims, CCQCs

    Thurs, Fri
    1/30-31

    Read 1/2 of contemporary novel of choice by now

    If you didn't finish in class, finish Fiction Analysis CCQC #4 (for "St. Chola") 

    Novel of choice check-in: give description and opinion on favorite and/or least favorite categories.

    Read sample analysis essay

    Either 

    • revise (or finish) previous work (break moment narration and 3 analysis CCQCs) and/or read novel of choice,
    • OR, for extra credit, expand 1 CCQC into a 4-5 paragraph analysis essay. 

    If writing full analysis essay:

    Write analysis essay title and assignment formatting (name, date, period, assignment label: "analysis essay").

    Write intro paragraph:

    • Author Name,
    • "Story Title" (or Novel Title),
    • any important background info (when written? part of a series? made into a movie? protested in 40 states?),
    • plot synopsis, 
    • thesis: theme and author's message about the theme

    Write three sub-claims for CCQC paragraphs: three different parts of the story where we see the theme. Write one sentence each that connects each separate part to the theme. These could be parts of the plot (e.g., the beginning, middle and ending), or different parts of the storytelling (e.g., one character, the setting, and one big event).

    Develop sub-claims into CCQCs. For each:

    • summarize the plot from that part or the author's decisions related to that claim
    • find the author's words from that part to quote as an example of what you mean
    • incorporate the quote
    • explain how that choice of the author connects to the overall theme and author's message

     

    Write conclusion: compare this story's message with either

    • your experience of life or advice you have been given
    • a different book or movie that had the same theme and either the same or a different message about it. 

    Follow these 3 steps to write it well:

    1. pick another book or movie with the same theme as the one you are analyzing, or an event in your life that shares the same theme.

    2. Write what the message (not just the theme) is for each of the two: the one you are analyzing and the one you are comparing. 

    3. Give one piece (or more) of evidence for each: a specific plot event, for example, that shows that this is the message in each.  

    Analysis: essay intro, sub-claims, CCQCs analysis
    Mon 2/3  Read contemporary novel of choice.

    Monday mechanics: active vs. passive voice

    active vs. passive voice
     Tues, Wed
    2/4-5

    Read contemporary novel of choice.

    If you didn't finish in class, revise (or finish) any previous work, or make progress on full analysis essay for one story. 

    Read novel of choice or short story provided: Dark, "The Gloaming." Write about a page on one or more of the following, analyzing the story and connecting it to your life:

    • Consider the title and what it represents. How many times in the story, and when, it is mentioned? what does it symbolize? Does dusk have a feeling for you? Explain.
    • There are different kinds of love in the world. Describe the kind that the mother and son in the story have, with examples. Do you have that kind in your life? What kind(s) do you have in your life?
    • Consider the ending. How was it set up, and what does it say about each character and their relationships? Have you ever held knowledge of someone that others did not share? Have you ever gotten knowledge of someone from a third person that made you appreciate both more? Explain the feelings and circumstances involved.

    Discuss. 

    Continue reading or your analysis essay (see last Thursday/Friday's lesson plan 2 boxes above this).

    Analysis 
    Thurs, Fri
    2/6-7

    Read 3/4 of contemporary novel of choice by now.

     

    Watch 22-minute short movie: "The Passage." Write theme and message. Discuss.

    Write "analysis conclusion paragraph" for one of the stories ("We Show What We Have Learned," "My Flamboyant Grandson," "Orange," "St. Chola" or "The Gloaming"), "The Passage," or your novel of choice: 

    • identify 1 or more books or movies that share the theme
    • identify a situation in the real world where the theme applies
    • compare/contrast the book or story's message about the theme with the message from the other works, or with what you see as the message in real life. 

    If time, read and take notes on novel of choice. 

     Analysis 
    Mon 2/10

    Read contemporary novel of choice.

     

    Monday mechanics: phrases, independent clauses, dependent clauses, compound sentences, complex sentences.

    phrases, independent clauses, dependent clauses, compound sentences, complex sentences.
     Tues, Wed
    2/11-12

     Read contemporary novel of choice.

    Finish analysis conclusion if you didn't in class

    30 minutes of Work time: Read and take notes on novel of choice; 
    finish extra credit analysis essay;
    make up missing work; revise low-scoring work.

    Begin movie

    Analysis 
    Thurs, Fri
    2/13-14
    Finish contemporary novel of choice. 

    30 minutes of Work time: Read and take notes on novel of choice; 
    finish extra credit analysis essay;
    make up missing work; revise low-scoring work. 

    Finish movie

    Analysis  

    Mon 2/17-
    Fri 2/21

     No School: February Break  (No school)  
     Mon 2/24  Finish contemporary novel of choice if you didn't by now. 

    Monday mechanics: verb tenses, subjunctive mood

     Verb tenses, subjunctive mood
    Tues, Wed
    2/25-26
     Finish contemporary novel of choice if you didn't by now. 

     

    Instruction: Critical Essay (Book Review). today's focus: the intro. 

    Write and share an introduction of the movie we watched: director, title, synopsis (summary), and overall opinion expressed as a simile or metaphor (find 2-3 adjectives to describe the reading experience. Think of something else, not a book or movie, that could share those adjectives. for example: "Reading about the violent racial injustices in this book is like drinking a pot of coffee: it makes you way more woke but also jittery and sick to your stomach.") 

    Work time: Begin book review of novel of choice with introduction: author, title, synopsis (summary), and overall opinion expressed as a simile or metaphor (see above).

    When done, write notes (using prompts from linked page above) on book. Also identify your favorite and least favorite categories.

    Criticism
    Thurs, Fri
    2/27-28
     Finish introduction of book review on contemporary novel of choice. Finish notes on book. 

    5 minute Pre-write: a series of I/you/we always/never statements, fictional or true. 

    Read novel of choice or story provided: Foer, "Here We Aren't, So Quickly."

    Write response in pattern of the text: continue a series of I/you/we always/never statements, fictional or true. Share; discuss. 

    Identify favorite and least favorite part of this reading...

    and of your contemporary novel of choice.

    Write one or both of your "favorite/least favorite" paragraphs for your novel of choice: for each start with a topic sentence that says what your favorite or least favorite thing about the book is. Then include substantial evidence from the beginning, middle and end of the book that shows the choices the writer made about this thing. (For the plot: what happens. For characters: how they develop or are revealed, and/or what big decisions they make. For the setting--time, place, cosmology, social pressures: how these are developed or revealed or figure into the plot; if they shift or change. Etc.) Then explain why you like or dislike these decisions, or what you like or dislike about them. 

    Criticism
    Mon 3/2  

     Monday mechanics: writing for mood

     Writing for mood
    Tues, Wed
    3/3-4
     Finish the first two body paragraphs of your book review of your contemporary novel of choice: your favorite and least favorite thing about the book, with evidence from beginning, middle and end, plus an explanation of why you like or dislike these decisions the writer made. 

    Presentation on scholarship opportunities from Lisa Neumaier.

    Watch 1st 5 minutes of Master Class video of Malcolm Gladwell describing the role of criticism

    Read Bolano, "Clara." 

    Writing prompt:

    1. Write 1-sentence review: what categories you liked and didn't like (plot, characters, setting, style, theme/message) with at least one adjective describing each (e.g., boring plot, surprising characters, interesting setting, confusing style).

    2. Then either

    a. describe one of the following in a 3-4 sentences:

    • a person more important to you than you seem to them
    • a relationship you have had over a long enough time that each of you, or the relationship itself, has changed
    • someone you love that is mentally or physically ill or deals with other serious issues, or who died

    or

    b. explain, in 3-4 sentences, what you liked most about the story in a way that makes the reader feel your sense of wonder at it, or makes the reader understand how it was accomplished. 

    Work time: Continue book review of novel of choice. Try to really explain what is good about book and try to recreate in your reader a sense of the wonder or admiration you feel and why. Or work on other paragraphs as you like, describing one category at a time with evidence from throughout the book, and expressing your opinion on it.  

    Criticism: topic sentences
    Thurs, Fri
    3/5-6
    Finish topic sentences for all body paragraphs of you novel of choice review. You should already have finished your introduction and first two body paragraphs (for best and worst categories). 

    Watch short movie: "Interesting Ball"

    Write description and opinion for the plot, plus two of the following categories: theme/message, characters, setting, acting, directing, cinematography (shots), effects, soundtrack. 

    Write conclusion of novel of choice review: identify who would and would not like the book and why; explain. Finish essay if possible (due Tuesday). 

    Criticism: descriptions and opinions (body paragraphs)
    Mon 3/9  

    Monday mechanics: style formula; voice exercise

     style/voice
    Tues, Wed 3/10-11

    Finish critical essay

    Finish voice write if you didn't in class on Monday (and mood write if you are still missing that from last Monday)

    Read short stories: "Greatest American Very Short Story" and "Greatest American Even Shorter Story"

    In pairs: identify the theme, message, and audience. Who would like each and who wouldn't?

    Solo: For each item in the New Releases cue (on either Netflix or in theaters now or on demand now), identify/describe the audience. 

    Sign up for turnitin. Here are the Course ID Codes:

    2nd Period: 23430652

    3rd Period: 23430680

    4th Period: 23430718

    The enrollment key for each is the word "period" (lowercase p) followed by your period number. For example: period1

    Review the essay rubric on turnitin. Peer edit essay. Revise it. Turn it in if done. 

    Heads up: by next class, choose your subject for a short (250-500-word, or about 3-4 shortish paragraphs) review on topic of choice: movie, book, restaurant, music release (song or album), video game, or event. You may do your review on video or as a speech if you prefer and are willing to share it with the class. 

    Criticism: conclusion
    Thurs, Fri 3/12-13

     Critical essay final draft

    Choose your subject for a short (250-500-word, or about 3-4 shortish paragraphs) review on topic of choice: movie, book, restaurant, music release (song or album), video game, or event.

    Turn in critical essay on novel of choice if you haven't yet.  

    We will read a short story, "Girl" by Jamaica Kincaid (Antigua, 1978), and watch a short video, "Youth," directed by Fraida Zahran (Cairo, 2019). Take notes/discuss.  

    Identify your subject for a short (250-500-word, or about 3-4 shortish paragraphs) review on topic of choice: movie, book, restaurant, music release (song or album), video game, or event. It may be on one of today's works: "Girl" or "Youth." You may do your review on video or as a speech if you prefer and are willing to share it with the class. 

    Begin:  Identify the 2-3 categories you will use to critique it.

    Write intro (orient reader to title and creator(s) and background/plot overview; give overall opinion.)

    Write 2-4 body paragraphs: describe a category and give opinion. Especially explain/appreciate what is special about it. 

    Conclusion: identify an audience.  

    Criticism
    DAY, DATE DUE TODAY

    DO IN CLASS

    SKILL FOCUS
    Mon 3/16  

    Monday mechanics: screenwriting: scene headings, action, speaker, dialogue, parentheticals

    We'll be writing a screenplay and turning some of these into movies. Today's lesson is just on formatting the basics. Go to google docs, open a new document, and click on the Add-ons box. Search for "Screenplay formatter" and add that, then "launch" it.

    Now try writing a short scene about anything that has the five necessary parts:

    • a scene heading (int. place name - day or ext. place name - night, for example),
    • action: a description of who is onscreen, what we see about where they are, and what they are doing
    • speaker (the name of someone about to say something)
    • dialogue (what they say)
    • parenthetical (how they say it)

    For each, give that part its own line, highlight it, and click on right label for it. The screenplay formatter will adjust the margins so it looks right. You may need to hit enter to get the right spacing above and below lines. Google "examples of screenplays" to see how these really look. Compare your formatting with the pros. 

     
    Tues, Wed
    3/17-18
    halfway through 250-500-word review on topic of choice. 

    Begin the short story "Cat Person"

    Continue 250-500-word review on topic of choice. 

    Criticism
    Thurs, Fri 3/19,20  finish solid draft of 250-500-word review on topic of choice. 

    Finish the short story "Cat Person" Google the title of the story and read what others say about it. It went viral and there are lots of opinions and thoughts out there. 

    Finish and turn in (to turnitin.com) your 250-500-word review on topic of choice.

    Begin screenwriting unit: brainstorm story ideas that can take place at a school, acted out by you and classmates. 

    Criticism
    Mon 3/23  list of story ideas that can take place at a school, acted out by you and classmates

    Monday mechanics: screenwriting: guiding cameras with action/descriptions, not camera instructions 

    Today's challenge: write a screenplay scene where you don't give camera instructions, but what the camera should do is clear based on what happens. For example, if you describe a mountain view, a wide shot is implied. If you go from there to talking about the hair sticking out of someone's nose, a close-up is implied. Guide the camera using descriptions of people, places and actions, without mentioning cameras. 

    If time, begin hw: turn your list of storie ideas that can take place at school and be acted out by you and your classmates into an outline for one such idea. 

     Screenwriting
      Note to My Classes:

    I sent an email home on the first day of the break that said the plan, but maybe some of you didn't get it. Here it is again: Last week, the 250-500-word review of anything was due on Friday on turnitin. I'm scoring those and entering them in the gradebook. 

    Everything else listed online here is extra credit unless I put it in bold and send an email about it. I'll try to have about 1 assignment a week that I actually collect. See the next box over for the message I just sent home and posted on google classroom.  I also activated this class in Google Classroom so you may get notifications through there. Meanwhile, check your grades in the Home Access Center and make up what you are missing from earlier. Email me if you have any questions. Stay healthy and sane!

    Hello Contemporary Lit students, 
     
    Hope you're staying healthy and sane in this illin' world. I'm writing to share this week's assignment and the basic plan moving forward. Today's classwork is to read this message closely and email me any questions. I have cc'd parents to help this message reach you--hi, parents!
     
    We are going to be writing screenplays. These are just stories like any other, except meant to be told as movies. They have a specific way of being formatted. This week, we're just practicing the formatting. We are going to use google docs' "Screenplay Formatter" add-on to help us out. 
     
    Next week, we'll start writing actual scripts, so you can start thinking about your main character, their need or quest, and what/who is in their way. We may never make these, since we may never get together in groups again (who knows?), so you can have any characters, setting and plot you like. They don't need to follow the original requirement of being about student-age people in a school-type setting. 
     
    (Extra credit opportunities: all the other stuff in my online calendar can get you extra credit if you do it and share it with me. Only this screenplay stuff is required and will be collected. And keep making up missing work--I'm accepting it late, and lots of you are missing stuff.)
     
    Due this Friday at 5 PM: A screenplay scene containing headings, action, speaker, dialogue, and parentheticals. It can be as silly and stupid as you please; don't worry about the plot or dialogue's content so much, just practice getting the margins and spacing and capitalization right. Use each of the 5 parts at least twice. 
     
    Here's how: Go to google docs, open a new document, and click on the Add-ons box. Search for "Screenplay formatter" and add that, then "launch" it.
     
    Now try writing a short scene about anything that has the five necessary parts:
     
    a scene heading (INT. PLACE NAME - DAY or EXT. PLACE NAME - NIGHT, for example),
    action: a description of who is onscreen, what we see about where they are, and what they are doing
    speaker (the name of someone about to say something)
    parenthetical (how they say it. this gets its own line between the speaker name and the dialogue. don't use it every time.)
    dialogue (what they say)
     
    For each, give that part its own line, highlight it, and click on the correct label for it in the screenplay formatter window to the right. The screenplay formatter will adjust the margins so it looks right. 
     
    All you need to do after that is hit ENTER in the right places to get the right spacing above and below lines. There should be a blank line after headings, after each line of dialogue, and after each action/description paragraph. There should not be a blank line between the speaker name and their dialogue, or above or below parentheticals. Google "examples of screenplays" to see how these really look. Compare your formatting with the pros. 
     
    Other guidelines to consider: Describe only what we see and hear (who is onscreen? What are they doing? What is in the background?). Do not explain background or character's thoughts, only their actions and expressions. Don't talk about cameras, only action. Remember to finish all sentences with a period (or question mark or whatever), even in dialogue. 
     
    This is low stakes formatting practice. Again, don't sweat the story, just practice the formatting. Share this with me as a google doc or through google classroom (I activated my google classrooms, and this message is posted there as well, as you may have noticed), not turnitin this time. 
     
    For those looking for more rigorous learning opportunities, do the work listed on my website (https://www.tamdistrict.org/Page/12171) for extra credit. 
     
    Thanks, and good luck!
     
    Mr. Doherty
     
    Tues, Wed
    3/24-25
     outline of one story idea that can take place at a school, acted out by you and classmates. 

    Start writing a screenplay that can take place at a school, acted out by you and classmates. 

    For instructions and inspiration, check out this how to write a screenplay page, and follow some links as inspired

     Creativity: screenwriting
    Thurs, Fri
    3/26-27
     

    Due Friday 5 PM: Screenwriting: scene headings, action, speaker, dialogue, parentheticals

    We'll be writing a screenplay and turning some of these into movies. Today's lesson is just on formatting the basics. Go to google docs, open a new document, and click on the Add-ons box. Search for "Screenplay formatter" and add that, then "launch" it.

    Now try writing a short scene about anything that has the five necessary parts:

    • a scene heading (int. place name - day or ext. place name - night, for example),
    • action: a description of who is onscreen, what we see about where they are, and what they are doing
    • speaker (the name of someone about to say something)
    • dialogue (what they say)
    • parenthetical (how they say it)

    For each, give that part its own line, highlight it, and click on right label for it. The screenplay formatter will adjust the margins so it looks right. You may need to hit enter to get the right spacing above and below lines. Google "examples of screenplays" to see how these really look. Compare your formatting with the pros. 

    Continue writing a screenplay that can take place at a school, acted out by you and classmates. 

    For instructions and inspiration, check out any of the videos you find in a google search on how to write a screenplay.

     Creativity: screenwriting

    Mon

    3/30 

     

     Extra credit option:

    Monday mechanics: words gone confused, part 1

    Read #1-13 in the list linked above. Write a sentence for each rule/convention to practice doing it right. 

     Common diction or usage errors

    Tues, Wed

    3/31-4/1

    1. catch up with late/missing work (check grades in Home Access Center, read descriptions here or in google classroom) or revise and resubmit low-scoring work

    2. Write an outline for an original screenplay to write. See below. Explained more thoroughly (with example) in google classroom.  

     

     

    Extra credit options:

    1. Practice writing a scene summary using someone else's movie: watch a short movie of your choice at shortoftheweek.com. Every time there's a new scene (new location or time), pause the video as necessary and write a correctly formatted scene heading, then hit enter twice and write a 1-sentence summary of what happens in that scene. 

    2. Read a book of choice. Maybe two: one non-fiction and one fiction. Write any kind of response you choose: analytical, critical, creative, personal, or simply summary.

     

    Creativity: screenwriting
    Thurs/ Fri
    4/2-3
     Due this Friday at 5 PM is a scene outline for a screenplay you will write starting next week. This will consist of 1-10 correctly formatted scene headings, each followed by a summary of what will happen in the scene. These will cover the locations and plot of the movie you want to write. We will have 3 weeks to finish the movie script after this. It will reach 5-20 pages long, in order to be a short movie about 5-20 minutes long. It should cover one of the following three structures:

    1. a situation that causes the main character's worldview to change. For example: someone starts cynical, something/someone happens, and they emerge hopeful.

    2. a situation that the main character needs to get of, but it's harder than expected. For example: a character is "trapped" somehow on a bad date, or by a kidnapper, or in a lie, and their first effort to get out only makes them more trapped.

    3. a main character has a goal or quest, but it's harder than expected. For example: a character wants to win a tournament, or go out with someone, or make the perfect piece of french toast, but their first effort only makes it more unlikely they will succeed because of some disaster.

    1. Finish and turn in your hw (see column to the left)

    2. Begin working on next week's assignment: write 1/3 of the screenplay you outlined. Start with a title page, then write the first scene. Remember to delete any summaries and replace them with moment to moment descriptions of what the audience will see and hear onscreen: scene headings, action, dialog

    2. Ongoing extra credit option: Read a book of choice. Maybe two: one non-fiction and one fiction. Write any kind of response you choose: analytical, critical, creative, personal, or simply summary. 

    Creativity: screenwriting
    Mon 4/6-
    Fri 4/10
     (No School: Spring Break)    
    Mon 4/13  

    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

    Extra credit options:

    Monday mechanics: words gone confused, part 2. Read #14-26 in the list linked above. Write a sentence for each rule/convention to practice doing it right. 

    Ongoing extra credit option: Read a book of choice. Maybe two: one non-fiction and one fiction. Write any kind of response you choose: analytical, critical, creative, personal, or simply summary. 

     Common diction or usage errors
    Tues, Wed
    4/14-15
       

    Zoom meeting today.

    3rd Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 969-4241-4418
    Password: 7cigYH

    2nd Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 9:30-10 AM
    Meeting ID: 990-8278-0411
    Password: 3htETp

    4th Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 976-1761-6849
    Password: 5JARuz

    2. Begin working on next week's assignment: write 1/3 of the screenplay you outlined. Start with a title page, then write the first scene. Remember to delete any summaries and replace them with moment to moment descriptions of what the audience will see and hear onscreen: scene headings, action, dialog

    2. Extra credit option: Read a book of choice. Maybe two: one non-fiction and one fiction. Write any kind of response you choose: analytical, critical, creative, personal, or simply summary. 

    Creativity: screenwriting
    Thurs, Fri
    4/16-17
     Write the first 1/3 of your original screenplay. Turn it in to the google classroom by 5 PM Friday.    Creativity: screenwriting
    Mon 4/20  

    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

    Extra credit options: 

    Monday mechanics: sound elements, part 1: multi-syllabic rhymes, alliteration, onomatopoeia. Follow the link to see the above explained. Write 1-2 examples of each. For an extra bonus, put them all into one poem. 

    Ongoing extra credit option: Read a book of choice. Maybe two: one non-fiction and one fiction. Write any kind of response you choose: analytical, critical, creative, personal, or simply summary. 

     Rhymes, alliteration, onomatopoeia
    Tues, Wed
    4/21-22
       

    Zoom meeting today.

    3rd Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 969-4241-4418
    Password: 7cigYH

    2nd Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 9:30-10 AM
    Meeting ID: 990-8278-0411
    Password: 3htETp

    4th Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 976-1761-6849
    Password: 5JARuz

    Creativity: screenwriting 
    Thursday, Fri
    4/23-24
    Write the second 1/3 of your original screenplay. Turn it in to the google classroom by 5 PM Friday.    Creativity: screenwriting 
     Mon 4/27  

    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

    Extra credit options: 

    Monday mechanics:  sound elements, part 2: assonance, consonance. Follow the link to see the above explained. Write 1-2 examples of each. For an extra bonus, put them into one poem. 

    Ongoing extra credit option: Read a book of choice. Maybe two: one non-fiction and one fiction. Write any kind of response you choose: analytical, critical, creative, personal, or simply summary. 

     Assonance, consonance
    Tues, Wed 4/28-29    

    Zoom meeting today.

    3rd Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 969-4241-4418
    Password: 7cigYH

    2nd Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 9:30-10 AM
    Meeting ID: 990-8278-0411
    Password: 3htETp

    4th Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 976-1761-6849
    Password: 5JARuz

    Speech in choice of mode (type of response)
    Thurs, Fri
    4/30-5/1
     Finish your original screenplay. Turn it in to the google classroom by 5 PM Friday.    Speech in choice of mode (type of response)
    Mon 5/4  

    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

    Extra credit options: 

    Monday mechanics: rhythm elements part 1: iambic pentameter (and other meters), kinds of repetition, rhyme scheme shorthand. Follow the link, or search google, to see the above explained. Write 1-2 examples of each. For an extra bonus, put them into one poem. 

    Ongoing extra credit option: Read a book of choice. Maybe two: one non-fiction and one fiction. Write any kind of response you choose: analytical, critical, creative, personal, or simply summary. 

     Rhythm and meter
    Tues, Wed
    5/5-6
       

    Zoom meeting today.

    3rd Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 969-4241-4418
    Password: 7cigYH

    2nd Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 9:30-10 AM
    Meeting ID: 990-8278-0411
    Password: 3htETp

    4th Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 976-1761-6849
    Password: 5JARuz

    Speech in choice of mode (type of response)
    Thurs/Fri
    5/7-8
        Speech in choice of mode (type of response)
    Mon 5/11  

    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

    Monday mechanics: rhythm elements part 2: meter imitation of rhythmic song verse of choice. Take one verse and the chorus from a favorite rap or song. Write it down. Now write something that follows the same rhythm: the same amount of syllables with the accented syllables in the same place. No rhyming necessary. 

    Ongoing extra credit option: Read a book of choice. Maybe two: one non-fiction and one fiction. Write any kind of response you choose: analytical, critical, creative, personal, or simply summary. 

     Rhythm and meter
    Tues/ Wed
    5/12-13

     

     

    Zoom meeting today.

    3rd Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 969-4241-4418
    Password: 7cigYH

    2nd Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 9:30-10 AM
    Meeting ID: 990-8278-0411
    Password: 3htETp

    4th Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 976-1761-6849
    Password: 5JARuz

    Speech in choice of mode (type of response)
    Thurs/ Fri
    5/14-15
        Speech in choice of mode (type of response)
    Mon 5/18  

    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

    Monday mechanics:  writing for audience. Reword an original passage for two different audiences that you identify. For example, write a one-paragraph description of a restaurant, show, movie, album or event, and make one version for snobby adults and one for fun-loving kids or teens. 

    Ongoing extra credit option: Read a book of choice. Maybe two: one non-fiction and one fiction. Write any kind of response you choose: analytical, critical, creative, personal, or simply summary. 

     Writing for audience

    Tues, Wed
    5/19-20
       

    Zoom meeting today.

    3rd Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 969-4241-4418
    Password: 7cigYH

    2nd Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 9:30-10 AM
    Meeting ID: 990-8278-0411
    Password: 3htETp

    4th Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 976-1761-6849
    Password: 5JARuz

    Creativity: poetry 
    Thurs. Fri 5/21-22     Creativity: poetry 
    Mon 5/25

    (Holiday: Memorial Day)

       
    Tues, Wed
    5/26-27
       

    Zoom meeting today.

    3rd Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 969-4241-4418
    Password: 7cigYH

    2nd Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 9:30-10 AM
    Meeting ID: 990-8278-0411
    Password: 3htETp

    4th Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 976-1761-6849
    Password: 5JARuz

    Creativity: poetry 
    Thurs, Fri
    5/28-29
        Creativity: poetry 
    Mon 6/1  

    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

    Extra credit Monday mechanics:  Semester review

    Ongoing extra credit option: Read a book of choice. Maybe two: one non-fiction and one fiction. Write any kind of response you choose: analytical, critical, creative, personal, or simply summary. 

    Extra credit Grammar and style techniques:

    • bold, italics, underlining
    • dangling modifiers
    • active vs. passive voice
    • phrases, independent clauses, dependent clauses
    • compound, complex sentences
    • verb tenses
    • subjunctive mood
    • writing for mood
    • writing for voice; varying voice for audience
    • screenplay formatting
    • common diction or usage errors ("words gone confused")
    • multi-syllabic rhymes, alliteration, onomatopoeia
    • assonance, consonance
    • rhythm and meter elements

     

    Tues, Wed
    6/2-3
       

    Zoom meeting today.

    3rd Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 969-4241-4418
    Password: 7cigYH

    2nd Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 9:30-10 AM
    Meeting ID: 990-8278-0411
    Password: 3htETp

    4th Period Meeting time/date: Every Wednesday 10:30-11 AM
    Meeting ID: 976-1761-6849
    Password: 5JARuz

     
    Thurs, Fri
    6/4-5
         
    Mon 6/8 (short class)

    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

     
Last Modified on April 13, 2020