• ComAcad AP Language and Composition

    Spring 2020

    with Mr. Dohertygdoherty@tamdistrict.org

     

    Welcome to this college-level class. Bookmark this page to find your homework and classwork easily. The class is divided into three major skill sets:

    Rhetorical Analysis: the ability to describe writers’ purposes and techniques, with evidence.

    Argument: the ability to take a stance on a policy, fact or value, and to support that stance with effective techniques.

    Synthesis Argument: the ability to read (and evaluate) a bunch of sources on a complex policy, fact or value, then take a stance and support that stance with effective techniques, including quoting and citing the sources. 

    We practice rhetorical analysis primarily through essays and multiple-choice tests. The proficiency scale is here
    We practice argument primarily through frequent essays. The proficiency scale is here
    We practice synthesis through unit essays and practice exams. The proficiency scale is here.

    We continue to cycle through all of these in several units over the course of the semester. We also work to integrate our curriculum with the other ComAcad courses through large and small collaborative film and design projects, culminating in this semester's Original Shorts project. 

     

    Bring

    There is homework almost every day for this class. Usually it will be turned in through Turnitin.com, unless it is a hard copy handed in. I do not accept shared google docs or email attachments.

    Students are required to keep a binder with five things in it, which will periodically be checked for credit: 
    1. The first page must be a current To Do list with your personal next tasks written down, as well as completed tasks checked off. 
    2. After this will come the handouts from class, kept on binder rings in order.
    3. Following this will be your notes from class. Do take notes: questions, thoughts, information taught but not on handouts. Date your notes. 
    4. You should also keep your returned or completed classwork and homework from this semester, on binder rings in order.
    5. Lastly, you should have plenty of lined paper to write on as needed.There will be a lot of writing during class. 

    Last but not least, bring a willingness to focus, to work hard, to support your peers in learning, and to enjoy the process!


    Grades

    All work is scored on 4-point scales, made available ahead of time when possible. They are mostly built from the AP standards and language, but also factor in timeliness/lateness. These can be translated into percentage scores through normal math (3/4=75%). However, these percentages, as a semester average, translate into letter grades as follows:

     

    % Range Grade
    99-100 A+
    89-98.99   A
    85-88.99   A-
    80-84.99   B+
    75-79.99   B
    68-74.99   B-
    62-67.99   C+
     56-61.99   C
     50-55.99   C-
    47-49.99   D+
    44-46.99   D
     40-43.99   D-
     0-39.99   F

     

    In other words, 4= A+, 3=B, 2=C-, 1=F.  As far as AP standards go, 3 = adequately meets the standard, 2 = does not adequately meet the standard. For example, if your homework prompt asks you to do something specific and you don't, that's a 2, no matter how hard you worked.

     

    Rules on Late Work, Revisions and Extra Credit

    Late work: You may turn in missing assignments up to a month late for reduced credit. Eligible late work is accepted until the end of your final exam. It will not be accepted after your class’ final or during vacation or the next semester. Work up to a week late can get up to a 3. Work up to a month late can get up to a 2. Work over a month late can only get a 1. 

    Revised work: You may revise work that scored 3 or below for a higher score. Revisions will not erase late penalties. Work revised within 1 week of being returned to you can earn a maximum of a 3.5; work revised after that can earn a maximum of a 3 (so you are rewarded for doing it right the first time or at least revising it promptly). Revised work and extra credit are not accepted during the last two weeks of the semester (Dead Week and Finals Week).

    Extra Credit: See me for extra credit opportunities. Let me know if you have any ideas. Generally, if you want to read or write something that's not for another class and is not your work recycled from the past, I'll give you extra credit for it. If you try to pass off something from another class or the past for extra credit, you are banned from getting extra credit for the year. You may boost your semester grade up to 5% with extra credit. 

    The daily plans and homework are below. Links to readings are provided as a courtesy, but you are expected to track down all readings even if the link fails to work. 

     

    Cell Phones

    Cell phones will stored in your slot in the chromebook cart at the beginning of each class and picked up at the end of each class. You may ask permission to use them as necessary. If I see your phone at all off the cart, not being used, I take it for the class period. If I see it being used without permission, I take it for the school day. You may get it back from me or the AP's office after school. From the second time I keep it until after school, your parent will have to pick it up. 

     

    Chromebooks

    There is a class set of Chromebooks, which are sometimes useful. One will be assigned to you. Do not use anybody else's. There are many like yours, but that one is yours. You are responsible for yours during the class period. This includes returning it to its spot and plugging in its charger. If that's too much to ask of you, then borrowing it is too much to ask of me. If yours goes missing or gets broken during your class period, you will have to pay for it.

     

    Calendar

    The calendar for what homework is due at the beginning of each class, and what we'll do every class, is below. Links are provided as a courtesy, but if they don't work, it's up to you to find necessary material by googling or by asking me in person.  

     

     

    World Lit Daily Schedule: Spring 2020

    Day, Date 

    Due at start of class (printed before)

    Do in class

    Skills Emphasized 

    Wed 1/8

     Work on Original Shorts script. Use prompts if desired. 

    Share break moments.
    Review Original Shorts project descriptor and schedule, semester plans.
    Write down 1-sentence Original Short synopsis: title and plot summary (and possibly theme/message). Share summary and status. 
    Watch sample short: "Nursery Rhymes." Write 1-sentence synopsis: title, filmmaker, plot summary. Discuss?
    Read shortoftheweek's analysis. Comments?
    Meet in movie groups: what idea do you like? Those without ideas plan to write own version of that idea, or choose from a list of prompts
    If able:
    List characters and casting ideas. 
    List locations/set design ideas. 

     organization, project planning

    Thurs 1/9

    Work on Original Shorts script. Use prompts if desired. 

     

    Doherty is not here Thursday. Here's the plan:

    Watch sample short: "Youth." Take notes on techniques. Write 1-sentence synopsis: title, filmmaker, plot summary. Share with partner.

    With partner, write condensed rhetorical analysis: theme, message about theme, 1 technique or decision, how that supports message. 

    Read the description below the movie by Shortoftheweek. Discuss. 

    As class try to come up with purpose of movie: real world issue, what this filmmaker wants done about it, and the role of this movie in that. 

    Write 1-sentence summary of the next part of your script to write.

    Write individual Original Shorts script.

    rhetorical analysis

    screenwriting 

    Mon 1/13

     Work on Original Shorts script

    Write 1-2-sentence weekend moment including one sensory detail, thought or line of dialogue. Write synopsis of original script if you haven't already. Share weekend moments.

    Share synopsis of your original short and its status.

    Review "message about theme" responses from last Thursday. Needs to be complete sentence with insight about life outside the story: the moral. 

    Watch sample short: "A Love Story." Take notes on techniques. With partner, write 1-sentence synopsis: title, filmmaker, plot summary. Write message about theme. Connect one technique to message. 

     

    rhetorical analysis,

    screenwriting 

    Tue

    1/14

    Individual script draft 

    Watch sample shorts: "Two Puddles" and ComAcad's "Gashlycrumb tinies." Take notes on techniques. For each, write 1-sentence synopsis: title, filmmaker, plot summary. Share with partner.

    For "Two Puddles," with partner, write condensed rhetorical analysis: theme, message about theme, 1 technique or decision, how that supports message. 

    Read the description below the movie by Shortoftheweek. Discuss. 

    As class try to come up with purpose of movie: real world issue, what this filmmaker wants done about it, and the role of this movie in that. 

    Write 1-sentence summary of the next part of your script to write.

    Write individual Original Shorts script.

    Rate your efficiency with work time. 

    That's it for today, but I'm just leaving these links below to other short videos and commentary here for now:

    Explore some recommendations and commentary from short of the week, including: https://www.shortoftheweek.com/news/lessons-from-a-decade-of-short-film-2010-2019/

    Damage ("I’m a fan of low-key awkward comedy—the type of stuff that deals with real people going through real sh-t, undercut by the uncomfortable introduction of a subversive comedic element.")

    (Locker RoomNegative SpaceLa Noria)

    Sometimes, I Think About Dying

    Hair Love

    Sister

    Branded Films brought together companies and filmmakers to tell more content-driven stories around shared values (to minor success) before largely fading out. Interactive Films explored many innovative new ways to consume a story (Welcome to Pine PointPossibilia) and even inspired the Netflix’s hit episode of Black Mirror: BandersnatchSci-Fi concept films proved a lucrative calling card for filmmakers hoping to land feature film deals (RuinTrue Skin). Doc portrait films gave us intimate peeks into new worlds (The Guy: The Brian Donahue StoryBeing Batman). Fan films gave us a way to entertain alternate paths for culture’s most obsessed-over stories. We even saw a handful of short filmmakers use their storytelling chops to cross over into gaming (Everything by David OReillyKids by Michael Frei). 

    Also, some of these

     

    rhetorical analysis,

    screenwriting 

    Thurs 

    1/16

     Work on Original Shorts script

    Write 1-sentence summary of the next part of your script to write.

    Write individual Original Shorts script.

    Rate your efficiency with work time. 

    screenwriting 

    Mon 1/20

    (No School: MLK, Jr. Day)

     

     

     

    Tues

    1/21

    Individual script finished, shared with group and Doherty

    Pitch and share scripts: 

    Fill out all-ComAcad shared doc with title, author and synopsis, and who, if anyone, has claimed it

    Read scripts and ideas. Work with group to choose script. 

    Once you choose script, everyone in group read it, bookmark it, get editing access to it, and begin revising it.

    Also copy the preproduction planning sheet and share a new copy with your group, then fill out the "Individual Roles and Responsibilities" page. 

     Script selection and collaboration

    Pre-production

    Thurs 

    1/23

    Group selects script idea and begins revising script 

    Individuals have filled out the ll-ComAcad shared doc with title, author and synopsis, and who, if anyone, has claimed it

    Groups have copied the preproduction planning sheet , saved their own version and filled out a draft of the "individual roles and responsibilities" page

    1. Continue to select and develop scripts. As necessary, use the all-ComAcad shared doc with title, author and synopsis, and who, if anyone, has claimed it

    2. As a group work through the preproduction planning process using this document. Share a new copy with your group, then fill out the "Individual Roles and Responsibilities" page to start. Work forward from there.  

     

     Pre-production

    Mon 1/27

     

    Share weekend moments. 

    Share script choices and status, and pre-production process status. 

    Continue pre-production process. 

     pre-production

    Tues

    1/28

    Group script selected

    Get and review prompt for Academy Awards Argument Essay assignment. 

    Watch sample short: 5th period:"Damage" ("I’m a fan of low-key awkward comedy—the type of stuff that deals with real people going through real sh-t, undercut by the uncomfortable introduction of a subversive comedic element.") 7th Period: " Negative Space." Take notes on techniques, then write a 1-sentence synopsis: title, filmmaker, plot summary. Share with partner.

    With partner, write a condensed rhetorical analysis: theme, message about theme, 1 technique or decision, how that supports message. 

    Read the description below the movie by Shortoftheweek. Discuss. 

    As class try to come up with purpose of movie: real world issue, what this filmmaker wants done about it, and the role of this movie in that. 

    Continue script development and pre-production process. 

    rhetorical analysis

    pre-production

    Thurs

    1/30

    Review the Academy Awards Argument Essay assignment. Choose your prompt and write your thesis. Take any notes and/or write an outline in preparation for writing the essay in class. 

    Write Academy Awards Argument Essay

    Score it

    If time: Pre-production continued

     argument

    Mon 2/3

     

    Share weekend moments. 

    Multiple choice practice: John Stuart Mills on Jeremy Bentham (q. 1-17) from 2007 AP exam

     

    Tues

    2/4

    Group script revised 

    Finish the multiple choice section if you didn't in class

    Correct/review multiple choice section from yesterday

    Short of day: "Bottle"

    Condensed rhetorical analysis: message/purpose, technique(s)/decisions, how techniques/decisions support purpose.

    Learn Essential rhetorical terms, with practice of part 1: write skits and perform skits on the A words. 

    Pre-production work. 

     

    Thurs

    2/6

    write skit using the following in the dialogue, and labeling each in parentheses after you use it:

    • ethos (credibility),
    • epigram,
    • euphemism,
    • hyperbole, and
    • one of the rhetorical terms beginning with "a" (alliteration, analogy, aphorism, anecdote, antithesis). 

    Short of day: "Small Deaths"

    Condensed rhetorical analysis: message/purpose, technique(s)/decisions, how techniques/decisions support purpose.

    Essential rhetorical terms, with practice of part 2: perform and film skits on ethos-Hyperbole

    Instruction: Irony. Watch these 3 Ted Talk Videos on Situational Irony, Dramatic Irony and Verbal Irony

    Pre-production work. 

     

    Mon 2/10

     

    Share weekend moments. 

    Movie trailer for 2020 Academy Award Winning documentary short "Learning to Skateboard in a War Zone (If You're a Girl)"

    Multiple choice practice: 2007 AP Exam q. 18-26: W.E.B. DuBois (unidentified) on segregation ("A man in the European sixteenth century was born...")

     

    Tues

    2/11

    Pre-production complete. Be prepared to share evidence with Doherty.  

    Write skit that uses 3 kinds of irony in the actions/dialogue. Label each in parentheses after you use it. 

    Short of day: 2020 Academy Award winner (live action short) "The Neighbor's Window

    Condensed rhetorical analysis: message/purpose, technique(s)/decisions, how techniques/decisions support purpose.

    Share pre-production plans.

    Essential rhetorical terms, with practice of part 3: perform and film skits on Irony.

    Learn terms from metaphor-oxymoron.

     

    Thurs

    2/13

    Share evidence that pre-production is complete with Doherty: script, cast list, shooting schedule, location list, props/costumes list. 

    write skit using the following in the dialogue, and labeling each in parentheses after you use it:

    • metaphor
    • metonymy
    • onomatopoeia
    • oxymoron

    Return and review answers for multiple choice questions.

    Short of the day: 2020 Academy Award winner (animated short) "Hair Love

    Condensed rhetorical analysis: message/purpose, technique(s)/decisions, how techniques/decisions support purpose.

    Essential rhetorical terms, with practice of part 4: perform and film skits on metaphor-oxymoron. Learn terms from paradox-understatement.

     

    Mon 2/17-

    Fri 2/21

    No School: February Break

     

     

    Mon 2/24

    If you did not do so before break, share evidence that pre-production is complete with Doherty: script, cast list, shooting schedule, location list, props/costumes list. 

    Share weekend moments. 

    Multiple choice practice. 

     

    Tues

    2/25

    Finish multiple choice section (#1-15) if you didn't in class.

    Write skit using the following in the dialogue, and labeling each in parentheses after you use it (then turn it in to turnitin.com):

    • paradox
    • personification
    • platitude
    • simile
    • understatement

    Correct multiple choice questions. Review questions you got wrong to understand why. 

    Short of Day: "Paths of Hate"

    Condensed rhetorical analysis: message/purpose, technique(s)/decisions, how techniques/decisions support purpose.

    Essential rhetorical terms, with practice of part 5: perform and film skits on paradox-understatement. 

    Practice rhetorical terms quiz. 

    Work time:

    • Study rhetorical terms for quiz next class
    • Make list of top 10 events or situations in life that evoke pathos
    • Meet with group to discuss communication/group dynamic so far, plan next shoot, share pre-production planning with me, or work on project as necessary

     

    Thurs

    2/27

    Learn Essential rhetorical terms if you haven't yet, especially A-I, which will be on a quiz in class

    Make a list of the top 10 events or situations in life that evoke pathos

    Short of the Day:"Sometimes, I Think About Dying

    Condensed rhetorical analysis: message/purpose, technique(s)/decisions, how techniques/decisions support purpose.

    Quiz on Essential rhetorical terms, A-I

    Write a pathos scene that you will be able to film. 

     

    Mon 3/2

     

    Share weekend moments. 

    Multiple choice practice: Thoreau on John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry (1859)

     

    Tues

    3/3

    First shoot complete 

    Learn Essential rhetorical terms if you haven't yet, especially L-U, which will be on a quiz in class

    Finish writing pathos scene that you will be able to film if you didn't in class. For 10-60-second film. Turn in to turnitin.com 

    Presentation on scholarship opportunities from Lisa Neumaier.

    Quiz on Essential rhetorical terms, L-U

    Partner/team up, shoot 10-60-second pathos scenes, 1 per person (basic mode: cell phones and imovie or equivalent.)

     

    Thurs

    3/5

    Edit the pathos scene and upload it to youtube to show to class on Thursday. Edits should include a soundtrack and titles (main title and actor, cinematographer, writer credits), plus any other edits you want (no others required). You can score a 4 if your video delivers real "feels" (emotions), a 3 if the emotions are presented ironically but use the techniques of pathos cinema (close-ups, music, a situation that matters to the character), or a 2 if the  techniques or length (should be 10-60 seconds) are inadequate. 

    Correct/return/review Monday's multiple choice set.

    Show pathos movies. 

    Short of the Day: "Castello Cavalcanti

    Rhetorical analysis practice: message/purpose, technique(s)/decisions, how techniques/decisions support purpose.

    Begin unit: practice exams. Get synthesis exam (on schools and conformity), read sources, take notes. 

     

    Mon 3/9

     

    Share weekend moments. 

    Multiple choice practice: Amy Tan, "I am a Writer..."

    Get synthesis exam if you were absent Thursday. 

     

    Tues 3/10

    Event posters?

    Finish multiple choice set if you didn't in class. 

    Read synthesis exam materials, take notes for essay. 

    Correct/return/review Monday's multiple choice set.

    Short of the Day: "Eight

    Condensed rhetorical analysis: message/purpose, technique(s)/decisions, how techniques/decisions support purpose.

    Review lesson: how to incorporate quotes

    Write synthesis essay. Turn it in.

     

    Thurs 3/12

     Find an additional source (writing, chart or image) that you could have used in your synthesis essay. Write a paragraph that uses it (by quoting and/or paraphrasing/describing it) in clear support of your clear thesis. After a double line break (skip a line to make a space), add an MLA citation for the source. 

    Short of Day:  "The Red Balloon"

    (Extra credit opportunity: also watch Don Herzfeld's "Bob's Balloon and write an argument essay answering the question: "Sentient balloons: are they good or evil?")

    Correct synthesis essay: score samples, read guidelines, score three peers' essays. Discuss. 

    Get Rhetorical analysis essay prompt: the 2013 RA prompt that excerpts Richard Louv's Last Child in the Woods. It can be found by scrolling down to page 10 here.

    If time: Read, annotate, begin essay. 

     

    Mon 3/16

     (begin rhetorical analysis essay)

    Share weekend moments. 

    Multiple choice practice: 

    Correct questions.

     

    Tues

    3/17

    Second shoot complete 

    Write rhetorical analysis essay on prompt given on Thursday: identify the writer's purpose, techniques, and how those techniques support the purpose. Walk your reader through the essay part by part explaining how the essay is working and why. 

    Watch short of the day: "Fauve"

    Do a short rhetorical analysis of the short: purpose/message, techniques/decisions, how  techniques/decisions support the purpose/message

    Correct your rhetorical analysis essay: see and score samples to understand the standard here; score yours. 

    Browse the College Board page of previous exam prompts. Know that it is there as a resource. Read a few. 

    Choose one argument essay prompt that appeals to you. Read it. If time, begin. 

     

    Thurs 3/19

    Find one source (writing, chart or image) that you could use to support an argument essay on the prompt given. Write a paragraph that uses it (by quoting and/or paraphrasing/describing it) in clear support of your clear thesis. After a double line break (skip a line to make a space), add an MLA citation for the source.

    Watch short of the day: "Jigsaw"

    Do a short rhetorical analysis of the short: purpose/message, techniques/decisions, how  techniques/decisions support the purpose/message

    If you have not yet done so, Browse the College Board page of previous exam prompts. Know that it is there as a resource. Read a few. If you have not yet done so, choose one argument essay prompt that appeals to you. 

    Write argument essay. 

     

    Mon 3/23

     

    Share weekend moments. 

    Multiple choice practice: Go to the AP Central site  (https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/). If you have not yet done so, or already been automatically enrolled, then enroll in my class there using Join Code  XR29ZY.

    Go into the AP Classroom and, if available, click the button to Take a Tour

    I have "unlocked" Units 1 and 2 for you. Each have some lessons as well as some assessments. MCQ assessments mean "Multiple Choice Questions." FRQ assessments mean "Free Response Questions" (essays.)

    Take the Unit 1 MCQ

     

      Note to my classes: 

    I sent an email home on the first day of the break that said the plan, but maybe some of you didn't get it. Here it is again: The rhetorical analysis essay on the prompt I gave out at school on Thurs 3/12 (see that day above if you need the link) was due last Friday on turnitin. I'm scoring those and entering them in the gradebook. 

    Everything else listed online here after home learning began is extra credit unless I put it in bold and send an email about it. I'll try to have about 1 assignment a week that I actually collect. The rest is meant to gear you up for the AP exam. I just sent an email with the assignments for the next two weeks. Look for them in bold below if you didn't get the email. I also activated this class in Google Classroom so you may find that email, and future communications, through there. Meanwhile, check your grades in the Home Access Center and make up what you are missing from earlier. Email me if you have any questions. Stay healthy and sane!

    By the way, the AP exam may be modified this year. A link to their explanation is here

     

    Tues

    3/24

     

     

    Short of Day: "Possibilia

    In the AP Classroom at https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/ , take one of the two FRQs (essays) for Unit 1. 

     

    Thurs

    3/26

     Due Friday 5PM: find and read 3 online editorials on issues or policies related to the corona virus--or search the college board previous exams' free response questions archives and find and read 3 previous rhetorical analysis (always question #2, so open one year and scroll down past the synthesis essay) readings/prompts.

    For each, write a thesis that contains the author name, the author's message/purpose, and three notable techniques they use to support their purpose. See my email from this week for examples. (This will not be collected, but send it to me if you want feedback to see if you're doing it effectively.)

    In the AP Classroom at https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/ , take (write) the other one of the two FRQs for Unit 1. 

     

    Mon

    3/30 

     

    Extra credit options/independent learning:

    Share weekend moments in google classroom. 

    Multiple choice practice: Questions 30-43, on the excerpt that begins, "By 1867, the year of Baudelaire's death..."

     

    Tues

    3/31

    Get caught up. Check your grades in the Home Access Center, do missing work or revise low scoring work. Find instructions for any assignment on this calendar (or, if from the last 2 weeks, in the google classroom.) 

    Extra credit/independent learning options:

    Short of the day: One of these 

    In the AP Classroom at https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/, take (write) one of the two FRQs for Unit 2. 

     

    Thurs

    4/2

    Due Friday 5 PM: For one of the argument essays/rhetorical analysis prompts you read (see last week's hw in bold, above), write a rhetorical analysis essay. Type it up and turn it in to turnitin.com. 

    Extra credit/independent learning options:

    Short of the day: one of these 

    In the AP Classroom at https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/, take (write) the other one of the two FRQs for Unit 2 or for the sample test you chose for this week's rhetorical analysis essay. 

     

    Mon 4/6-

    Fri 4/10

    (No School: Spring Break)

     

     

    Mon 4/13

     

     This week's assignment is (1) to review (and perhaps revise) your rhetorical analysis essay from last week, and (2) to write a synthesis essay from one of the previous AP prompts.

    (1) To review your rhetorical analysis essay, first read my comments, then read the sample essays and commentary provided by the College Board for the prompt you used. Ask yourself what those essays have that yours does not, or what those scorers were looking for that you were not aware of. Make mental or actual notes, and/or revise your essay accordingly. I will not collect these notes, but if you resubmit a revised essay to me, you can get a higher score on it. You can find the sample essays and the scorers' commentary on them through the "Sample Responses" links on the "Previous Exams" page, here: https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-english-language-and-composition/exam/past-exam-questions?course=ap-english-language-and-composition

    (2) We will then repeat this cycle for a synthesis essay. Go to the college board website of previous prompts linked above. Read a few of the Q1 (synthesis essay) prompts and choose one that interests you. Write that essay. (If you were one of the people who did the synthesis essay last week by accident, find Q2 and do the rhetorical analysis essay this week.) The keys to a successful synthesis essay are as follows:

    --make dang sure you're answering the question they are asking you, and taking a clear stance on the issue
    --use at least 3, but preferably at least 4, of the sources they give you.
    --organize your argument into 5 or more paragraphs, with an intro that gives context and your thesis; 3 or more body paragraphs each dedicated to a different reason why you are right, or the other side's best argument and why they are wrong; and a conclusion that connects this issue to today's world or a bigger picture somehow.
    --incorporate your quotes: attach them to your own sentences with a colon, attribution or by splicing. Don't just have quotes floating there between sentences.
    --"make sure your argument is central": if you are paraphrasing or quoting a source, make sure you connect it to your thesis either as support or as something to rebut.
    --polish your mechanics, and don't be afraid of having some personality in your voice.

    Please type this essay and submit it to the Google classroom (not turnitin) by 5 PM this Friday.

     

    Tues

    4/14

     

    Short of the day: one of these 

    Zoom class meetings today. 

    5th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 12 noon-12:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 940-7398-7543
    Password: 4BgrF1

    7th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 1-1:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 972-8161-8060
    Password: 9ea2S5

     

    Thurs

    4/16

    Synthesis Essay due by Friday at 5 PM. See Monday's description or visit the Google classroom for details. 

     

     

    Mon 4/20

     

     Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

     

    Tues, Wed

    4/21

     

    Zoom class meetings today. 

    5th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 12 noon-12:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 940-7398-7543
    Password: 4BgrF1

    7th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 1-1:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 972-8161-8060
    Password: 9ea2S5

     

    Thursday

    4/23

       

     

    Mon 4/27

     

    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

     

    Tue 4/28

     

    Zoom class meetings today. 

    5th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 12 noon-12:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 940-7398-7543
    Password: 4BgrF1

    7th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 1-1:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 972-8161-8060
    Password: 9ea2S5

     
    Thurs April 31      
    Mon May 4    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment  
    Tue May 5  

    Zoom class meetings today. 

    5th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 12 noon-12:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 940-7398-7543
    Password: 4BgrF1

    7th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 1-1:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 972-8161-8060
    Password: 9ea2S5

     
    Thurs May 7      

    Mon May 11

       Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment  
    Tue May 12  

    Zoom class meetings today. 

    5th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 12 noon-12:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 940-7398-7543
    Password: 4BgrF1

    7th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 1-1:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 972-8161-8060
    Password: 9ea2S5

     
    Thurs May 14      
    Mon May 18    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment  
    Tue May 19  

    Zoom class meetings today. 

    5th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 12 noon-12:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 940-7398-7543
    Password: 4BgrF1

    7th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 1-1:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 972-8161-8060
    Password: 9ea2S5

     
    Thurs May 21      
    Mon May 25  (Memorial Day: no school)  Remember the fallen.   
    Tue May 26  

    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment

    Zoom class meetings today. 

    5th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 12 noon-12:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 940-7398-7543
    Password: 4BgrF1

    7th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 1-1:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 972-8161-8060
    Password: 9ea2S5

     
    Thurs May 28      
    Mon June 1    Check Google classroom for announcements, this week's assignment  
    Tue June 2  

    Zoom class meetings today. 

    5th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 12 noon-12:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 940-7398-7543
    Password: 4BgrF1

    7th Period Meeting time/date: Every Tuesday 1-1:30 PM
    Meeting ID: 972-8161-8060
    Password: 9ea2S5

     
    Thurs June 4      
    Mon-Fri June 8-12 Final Exam Week    
Last Modified on May 21, 2020