• AP Language and CompositionSyllabus                                     THE AMERICAN DREAM

     

    Course Overview

     

    AP College Board Course Introduction

    An AP course in English Language and Composition engagesstudents in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods,disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers whocompose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading shouldmake students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audienceexpectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and theresources of language contribute to effectives in writing.

     

    District AP Language and Composition Course Description

    Advanced Placement Composition is a college level Englishcourse, taught over two semesters, which provides students with a chance toextend their competence by challenging them with difficult texts and writingassignments, following the standardized course of study developed by theCollege Board Advanced Placement program. The course is open to juniors andseniors. Students will engage in close reading of significant works ofliterature and write analytically and critically about that literature andother topics.

     

    Teacher Course Introduction

    This is a one-year intensive non-fiction based English coursethat is the equivalent of at least one semester of college freshman English.The course emphasizes the different rhetorical essay writing modes, closereading, and critical thinking skills. The course material is drawn from avariety of college-level non-fiction anthologies and the district’s course ofstudy for this class. AP Comp is a tremendously demanding course for bothteacher and students. The homework load is equal to adding another half-classto one’s schedule.

     

    More important, AP Composition teaches students tounderstand how a writer argues and persuades, how to write clearly andconcisely, how to provide support for their claims, and how to researcheffectively. It’s a class that helps them write for every subject, not just thetypical fiction and literature-based English classes.

     

    Skills and How Those Skills Are Learned

     

    The AP Language and Composition Student

    It requires a developed writer who, upon entering the class,has a basic understanding of language structure, language manipulation foreffect, audience, purpose, rhetorical devices, and argument strategies. The APstudent must be mature and willing to discuss and debate the content and thestructure of what we read. The students must also be willing to listen to theopinions of others. The student must be willing to write on-demand timedessays. The student must be willing to read about twice the amount of readingof an average high school English class. The student must be willing to studyfor the AP exam on his or her own, using an AP study guide. The student shouldnot miss the weekly class meeting since discussion is an integral cog of thisclass. This student must meet deadlines with weekly homework assignments andcome to class prepared. There is so much material that needs to be covered inthis class, that each minute we spend together is vital to doing well on the APexam in May.

     

    Writing and Revision

    Revision is an important part of the writing process. Thereare specific assignments that will benefit from formal peer-editing sessions inclass, and teacher editing comments and feedback. As a student, if you feelyour work needs additional feedback and editing, you are welcome to re-submityour assignment for further comment and a better grade, depending on actualimprovement. Assignment checklists, specific score guides, and grading rubricsstapled directly to your drafts will include feedback details that will helpyou understand the revision process.

     

    Grading

    Each unit will be graded as a whole because each unitcontains a its own set of assignments and assessments. But there are some basicguidelines:

    Group projects/presentations

    1200-word essays with rough draft and bibliography

    750-word essay

    600-word reader response essays

    Book analysis quote and response sets

    AP practice exams/re-writes/reflection

    Literary terms quizzes

    Grammar/usage quizzes

    Interactive journal

    Summer work assignment

     

     

    AP Language and Composition Summer Assignment

     

    Welcome to Advanced Placement Composition. This class is acollege-level reading and writing course and you are expected to docollege-level work in both difficulty and volume. Part of any AP class includesrequired summer work in order to (1) adequately prepare you for the upcomingyear and so that (2) the entire class shows up to school the first day with asimilar set of knowledge.

     

    Our goal is to make the best use of the limited class timewe share together and the summer work ensures that we can skip some of theremedial work and get to the more advanced materials. Any college freshmanEnglish professor would expect you to have learned much of this in your highschool classes. This work is not an option and it will be logged into the gradebook as the first work you have done for the upcoming year. If the work is notcomplete and turned in the first day of the fall semester, you will be droppedfrom this course.

     

    1. Literary Terms List

    Define the AP list of literary terms. This typed list ofterms will be your reference guide during the year and a good study guide forthe AP exam in May. As you read this summer, find examples of these writingtools as they are used by authors in the reading and analysis required for the Reader Response assignment describedbelow. Here are a few web sites that may help:

     

    http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Terms/

    http://www.notesinthemargin.org/glossary.html

    http://www.virtualsalt.com/litterms.htm

    http://www.wallkillcsd.k12.ny.us/glt.htm

     

    2. The Best American Essays of theCentury (TBAEOTC), Joyce Carol Oates

    The AP folks expect you to have read hundreds of differentessays written by hundreds of different authors about dozens of differentsubjects. This collection of twentieth century works are just the beginning ofa year spent reading and analyzing essays, and this text will provide a solidbase from which we can build exposure to important non-fiction work. There aretwo assignments associated with this text:

     

    A.Close Reading of the Text

    You have a brand new soft-cover copy of TBAEOTC that we have given you. You’re your annotations directly onthe pages of the text; highlighting, underlining, and making margin notes asyou see fit. Use your literary terms of definitions to identify author styleand technique. Take a look at what you have highlighted and underlined, thequestions you have about the text, and the comments about meaning you make inthe margins. Use what you have discovered to create your two-paragraphresponses for each essay. This is a process of the analysis you will use whenreading similar non-fiction work in class during the year ahead of you.

     

    B.Reader Responses for TBAEOTC

    Complete a 200-word (two paragraph/half-page, double-spaced)word-processed response for each of the 55 essays. Analyze each essay for anyof these four aspects and you should provide clear evidence to support youranalysis and opinions:

    1. Audience. For whom do you think this piece was written? How do you know?
    2. Author’s purpose for writing the piece. What are your clues?
    3. Stylistic devices and rhetorical strategies used in the piece. Use your literary terms list to identify and briefly explain what tool(s) the author used and why.
    4. The meaning of the piece to you. This is where you can (briefly) elaborate about your personal reaction to the piece. Specific textual evidence is crucial to thoughtful analysis.

     

    Include the author and the title of the essay and formatthis big document so that it is easy for me to determine which essay you’veanalyzed.  You may write more if youwish, but I’m looking for what you found effective and why. Do not flatter anauthor and do not criticize an author. Be objective, clear, and concise. Useterminology only if you know how to apply the term. Tell me how the piece makesyou feel and think and how the author did it to you. Don’t even think aboutsummarizing.

     

    We will continue to analyze essays in this same structuredmethod throughout the year. There are hundreds of authors on the must-read APComp list, and TBAEOTC contains agood number of them. Some will confuse and confound you. That’s okay. Don’tfocus on what confuses you; look for what is effective or interesting or artisticor weird or powerful or persuasive.

     

    In the first two weeks of class in the fall we will discussyour summer work. Be prepared to explain your analysis and interpretation ofthe readings. Your work will be graded for following directions for the readerresponse assignment, for use of the literary terms, and for clarity andconcision.

     

    3. Grammar and UsageReview/Citing Source Material

    You must review grammar and usage over the summer. When webegin in the fall, we will study and assess your ability to identify and useproper grammatical structure. I have given you The Elements of Style, which isshort and very helpful. Many AP Composition preparatory guides offer grammarreview. Woe is I and The Transitive Vampire are good choices,and are sort of fun to read – for grammar/usage books. Also, you must reviewthe MLA guidelines for citing sources and review proper use of evidence inessays that are analytical, expository, and argumentative. Here are a few sitesthat will help you properly format your research and source materials:

     

    http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Writing/

    http://rhslibrary.org/

    http://rhsweb.org/library/citing_sources.htm

    http://www.citationmachine.net/index.php?callstyle=1&all=

     

    4. AP InteractiveJournal

    Find an 8.5 x 11 inch, sturdily boundjournal over the summer. This is an informal writing tool that increases yourwriting fluency. In this journal you will log your reactions to a wide varietyof formal and informal readings, graphic and visual images, cultural andnewsworthy events, personal milestones and personal difficulties. I will posequestions and you will respond to them informally in the journal. You maydevelop your informal written reactions into some of the assignments you willfind in this class later in the year. You will include materials that you reactto in the journals. Simply glue images, comic strips, drawings, photographs,etc., into the journal page adjacent to your written reaction. Your impetus towrite will always be on the left and your reaction will always be on the left.Essentially, this method of organization, writing volume and frequency, and thesize of the journal are the only rules you will live by. I will check yourjournals at the end of each unit and your grade will reflect the volume youhave written, not the correctness of your journal entries.

     
    AP Language andComposition Monthly Thematic Units

     

    Unit 1/August and September – Education in America

     

    Unit 1 Reading Assignments

    1. And Still We Rise,by Miles Corwin. Write 20 quote and responses as informal analysis of the text.

     

    2. Reader Responseessays. You will read a variety of opinions from a variety of different erasfrom a variety of different authors. You will write a 600-word analyticalresponse to each essay. We will exchange student papers, then we will findeffective analysis and writing technique, and then share your effective prose withthe class. We will also discuss the essay you have analyzed. We will have peerediting sessions and revision of selected essay responses. Focus is on clearidentification and analysis of: purpose, audience, style, and meaning. Theseare formal essays, as brief as they are, and your work should reflect increasedcare and craft. Many of the stylistic elements you will identify should beginto show up in your own work. Take stylistic risks. Back up your analysis withspecific examples from each text.

    • Best in Class, by Margaret Talbot.
    • The Speech the Graduates Didn’t Hear, Jacob Neusner.
    • The Myth of the Cave, by Plato.
    • How Women Learn, by Mary Field Belenky, Blythe McVicker Clinchy, Nancy Rule Goldberger, and Jill Mattuck Tarule.
    • Learning to Read and Write, by Frederick Douglass.
    • Such, Such were the Joys…, by George Orwell.
    • Order in the Classroom, by Neil Postman.
    • Getting In, by Malcolm Gladwell.
    • Our Schools for Scandal, by George Will.

     

    Unit 1 Writing Assignments

    • Education Issue expository essay. Student chooses a current education issue and writes a 1200-word expository essay, complete with bibliography.
    • Interactive journal. Reactions to education issues in the news.

     

    Unit 1 Practice AP Exams

    • Practice AP exams: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. In-class timed essay, re-write of timed essay, and reflective paragraphs describing specific elements you changed after revising and why you changed them. A process we will continue throughout the semester.
    • Practice AP multiple-choice questions. Analysis of answers. Reflection for each incorrect answer. 

     

    Unit 1 Weekly Skill Building Lessons

    • Discussion of AP exam structure and scoring rubric.
    • Discussion of the AP recommended author list.
    • Connotation and denotation lesson.
    • Summer assignment re-visited. Discussion of summer reading. Annotation and marginalia discussion. 
    • Clauses lesson.

     

    Unit 1 Assessments

    • Parts of speech quiz. The first of several grammar and usage quizzes.
    • Clause quiz.
    • Weekly literary term quizzes. (See attached sample assignment 2)

     

    Unit 2/October –Memoir/Biography/Autobiography/Personal Narrative

     

    Unit 2 Reading Assignments

    • Read Growing Up, by Russell Baker or This Boy’s Life by Tobias Wolff (depending on whether you read This Boy’s Life junior year in American Literature): Structural analysis responses. 
    • Read In Plato’s Cave, by Alvin Kernan: (1) Structural analysis, (2) Content analysis, (3) Vocabulary research and definitions, (4) In Plato’s Cave book review analysis.
    • Read and analyze several examples of effective college essays from past AP students and from anthologies of college essays that worked.

     

    Unit 2 Writing Assignments

    • Compare and contrast 600-word essay: Compare Baker/Wolff’s style and stories to Kernan’s.
    • Write the Personal Statement/College Essay. Multiple drafts: in-class peer editing using UC rubric for personal statements and checklist for college-level writing. Teacher feedback for each of the three consecutive drafts, using a teacher-generated college essay score guide.
    • Interactive journal. Informal brainstorming for the college essay.

     

    Unit 2 Group Presentation

    • Group project/oral presentation: MLA formatting, citing primary and secondary sources, using source material effectively. Each student will research a different category of source material, from the Internet to multiple periodicals.

     

    Unit 2 Weekly Skill Building Lessons

    • In Plato’s Cave vocabulary research and definitions.
    • Lessons focused on sentence variety and length for pace, coordination and subordination,
    • Tone mini-lesson. Looking at, listening to, and reading a variety of sources to identify tone and how an artist, musician, filmmaker, or writer can achieve a specific tone. How stylistic choices lead to tone.
    • Pronoun lesson.

     

    Unit 2 Assessments

    • Practice AP multiple choice exams, student analysis and reflection of incorrect answers.
    • Practice AP free response prompt: Gary Soto’s autobiographical narrative about stealing a pie. Timed write, re-write, one paragraph analysis.
    • Synthesis prompt I (television’s effect on presidential campaigns).
    • Literary terms quizzes.
    • Pronoun quiz.

     

    Unit 3 November – War/Death/Oppression

     

    Unit 3 Reading Assignments

    • Read: Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut.
    • Read: The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood.
    • Reader Response: The Terrible Waste of War, by Ernie Pyle. Specific focus on concrete and abstract language in descriptive writing. Part of a lesson about diction.

     

    Unit 3 Writing Assignments

    • Vonnegut Essay inspired topic: Killing Civilians as a War/Battle Strategy.
    • Film analysis essay: Slaughterhouse-Five. Watch film version and compare to Vonnegut’s text. Choose a method of compare-and-contrast: point-by-point, or subject-by-subject.
    • The Handmaid’s Tale Essay. Topic: The Dystopian View of the Future and Present.
    • Film analysis essay: The Handmaid’s Tale. Compare to Atwood’s text. This is a ???
    • Death Penalty Argument Essay, rough draft, final draft. This 1200-word multi-draft essay is directly related to the topics covered in the group presentations.
    • Interactive journal. Reactions to global, local, personal conflict. Images of war, images of suffering, images of totalitarian societies.

     

    Unit 3 Group Presentation

    • Death Penalty Research Project: Oral Presentation, and Panel Discussion.

     

    Unit 3 Skill Building Lesson

    • Diction: concrete and abstract language, from Pyle’s essay.
    • Punctuation: commas, semi-colons, colons, and dashes.

     

    Unit 3 Assessments

    • Practice AP exam. 1997 AP free response prompt: Neil Postman contrasts George Orwell’s vision of the future in 1984 with that of Aldous Huxley’s in the novel Brave New World. Timed write, re-write, and reflective paragraph.
    • Practice AP exam. 1995 AP free response prompt: The Company Man, by Ellen Goodman. Timed write, re-write, and reflective paragraph.
    • Weekly literary terms quizzes.
    • Punctuation quiz.

     

    Unit 4 December –Money and Culture in America

     

    Unit 4 Reading/Viewing Assignments

    • Choose-your-own Money and Culture in America BOOK.
    • Choose-your-own Money and Culture in America FILM.
    • Choose-your-own Money and Culture in America ARTICLE. 

     

    Unit 4 Writing Assignments

    • Money and Culture synthesis essay, using all above sources, plus your own perspective and experience. Focus on use of source material as evidence. 1200 words with formal bibliography.
    • Interactive journal. Reactions to materialism and commercialism during the holiday season. Find ads for the holidays and post your reactions. What are the priorities in your family? How do you celebrate this season and what is the relationship between money and culture in your family. Brainstorm for the final unit essay on money and culture in America.

     

    Unit 4 Skill Building Lessons

    • Active and passive voice.

     

    Unit 4 Assessments

    • Practice AP exam: Lewis Lapham prompt about money.
    • AP mid-term exam. The mid-term is a released AP exam: 53 multiple-choice questions and two free response questions. You have the normal two hour class period to complete the exam. For this specific exam, you will be scored using a bell curve scale.
    • Active and passive voice quiz.

     

    END OF FIRST SEMESTER

     

    Unit 5 January –Family/Identity/Community Unit

     

    Unit 5 Reading Assignments

    • Read: The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, by Sherman Alexie.
    • Watch: Smoke Signals. Create a 750-word essay that compares the episodic and surreal structure of the book with the linear concrete film.
    • Read: The Fire Next Time, by James Baldwin. Ten quote and responses.
    • Reader Response Essays:

    LikeMexicans, by Gary Soto.

    What’sIn a Name? The Meanings of a Word, by Gloria Naylor.

     

    Unit 5 Writing Assignments

    • Identity/Community Essay. Personalize the issue of identity by writing a 1200-word essay
    • Formal written analysis of the reader response essays.
    • Interactive journal. Define and explain your community, your neighborhood, your household, your ethnicity, your traditions, your family’s culture. Brainstorm ideas for your identity essay. Find images of the different Americans that make up this country. What do you know about them? What would they say about you?

     

    Unit 5 Skill Building Lesson

    • Parallel structure within sentences.

     

    Unit 5 Assessments

    • Parallel structure quiz.
    • Literary term quizzes.

     

    Unit 6 February – Women and Men

     

    Unit 6 Reading Assignments

    Reader Response Packet:

      1. Our Bodies, Ourselves (preface and introduction)
      2. Struggling for Perfection,
      3. Our Barbies, Ourselves
      4. What Barbie Really Taught Me
      5. Why Boys Don’t Play with Dolls
      6. The Origins of Anorexia Nervosa
      7. The Female Body
      8. Of Cocks and Men
      9. The Male Myth

    10. Black Men and Public Space

      1. How Boys Become Men
      2. The Other Difference between Boys and Girls
      3. The Sexes Are Not Born With Different Brains
      4. Women’s Brains

     

    Unit 6 Writing Assignments

    • A Room of One’s Own essay.
    • Reader response essays that analyze the 14 gender issue essays.
    • Gender cause and effect argument research essay. Find a current gender issue and take a position that you can argue effectively. Use the different readings you have done to spark an idea that you can craft into a 1200-word essay. You must provide ample evidence to effectively argue your position: scientific studies, anecdotal evidence, interviews, graphs, charts, etc. You must provide a formal bibliography for your source material. There will be one in-class peer-editing session and one teacher-edited copy of this paper.
    • Interactive journal. Brainstorm gender (sex) essay. React to images in the media: magazine and newspaper ads, cartoons, comic books, films, song lyrics, statistics, etc. What stereotypes hold men and women back, if they do? What types of images are we exposed to? Find a magazine or newspaper article about gender that specifically interests you.

     

    Unit 6 Skill Building Lessons

    • A Room of One’s Own vocabulary list of definitions.
    • Editing skill: how to avoid wordiness. In-class worksheets with long-winded sentences that have redundant language. 

     

    Unit 6 Assesments

    • Wordiness quiz.

     

    Winter Break

     

    Unit 7 March – Nature/Environment

     

    Unit 7 Reading Assignments

    • Read: A Civil Action, by Jonathan Harr (see sample assignment 1)
    • Wendell Berry vs. Aldous Huxley
    • Walden, Thoreau
    • The Redwoods, John Muir
    • Nature, by Emerson

     

    Unit 7 Writing Assignments

    • A Civil Action four-part analysis and research project.
    • Environmental issue research essay. Craft a 1200-word essay that explores a current environmental issue. You will use a journalism feature story format and style to report about the topic you select.
    • Reader response analysis of classic nature essays.
    • Interactive journal. Reactions to media’s reporting of the environment. What do you hear? What do you seek out in the media? What do you ignore? What images come to mind when you think of the current state of the environment?

     

    Unit 7 Skill Building Lesson

    • Editing Skill: eliminating the verb to be and proper tense choice.
    • Editing Skill: eliminating dangling modifiers.

     

    Unit 7 Assessments

    • AP practice exam Joan Didion’s AP prompt: The Santa Ana Wind
    • Tense quiz.
    • Dangling modifier quiz.

     

     

    Unit 8 April – ModernAmerican Historical Snapshot: The 60s and 70s

     

    Unit 8 Reading Assignments

    • Read: The White Album by Joan Didion. Take notes as you go. You must consider your research project as you read. Turn in your notes (handwritten or word-processed) with your expository essays.
    • Define each of the 425 vocabulary words for this book from the list I have provided. The list is separated by each chapter, with an ALL-CAPITALS title for each chapter. Word-process your list and do it before you read the book so that you can use the definitions as a valuable reference guide. I will check this list at the next class meeting.

     

     

    Unit 8 Group Presentations

    • Prepare a 15-minute presentation for each of your three topics. Each person must speak and you must have evidence to show us. Since this is an oral and visual presentation, you must provide your audience with enough evidence to explain your topic. Do not assume your audience knows anything: explain everything clearly and completely. Decide how you will share the information. No posters. See above. I will use the district outcome speaking certificate rubric for speaking skills and for visual aids. You must provide me with a presentation outline for each topic one week before the presentations.

     

    Unit 8 Writing Assignments

    • Modern American Historical Snapshot: The 60s and 70s. Prepare an expository essay for each individual topic. Write an essay that exposes and explains the nine topics. Limit yourselves to two or three pages per topic and make clear connections to The White Album. Divide the work evenly. Use adequate evidence and cite your sources according to MLA style. This essay must inform and educate, not pontificate. Bring three copies of your rough drafts into class in two weeks for peer and teacher editing. We will use the peer-editing checklist.
    • Write a 200-word (three paragraph) reflection about this project. (Paragraph 1) Share specific difficulties and successes you had experienced while working with your group partners. (Paragraph 2) Explain your research process while preparing for this project. (Paragraph 3) Describe the specific choices you made for the oral presentation and why you made them.
    • Interactive journal. How would you compare what happened in the 60s and 70s with today? How does Vietnam compare to Iraq? How do you feel about the sprit of activism, especially of the youth in your generation, and what you found out about the 60s and 70s? What aspects of art, culture, politics, fashion, media, music, and literature will AP classes be studying in 30 or 40 years?

     

    Spring Break

     

    Unit 9 May – THE APEXAM

     

    Unit 9 Reading Assignments

    • Create and review your AP study guide binder. After organizing each section by thematic unit, creating a table of contents page, and organizing all of your graded work, review the materials in anticipation of the AP exam. Your grade for this assignment is based on organization and completeness. Most of these binders contain about 250 pages of graded written work, assignment sheets, score guides, annotated essays, practice exams, and multiple drafts of essays.

     

    Unit 9 Group Presentation

    Documentary Film as Persuasive Essay

    • Film Jobs: Each person must have a definable role in the making of the film. I need to see concrete evidence that each person worked on some aspect of the project. How will you show me this evidence?
    • Film length: 5 -10 minutes. But absolutely no longer than 10 minutes.
    • Documentary film proposal: A written proposal that outlines the group’s idea for the film. Must be word-processed and turned in by this Friday or sooner.
    • Documentary film shooting script: Each segment or episode should be planned out before you turn the camera on. How long will each camera shot be, what type of shot will you use, and how will you edit the shots together? Must be word-processed and turned in.
    • Documentary film dialogue script: This is your road map for what you want us to learn or hear from your subjects. What interview questions will you ask and what order will you present the information? Must be word-processed and turned in.
    • Documentary film project reflection:  Complete one word-processed document that contains at least one paragraph of reflection from each person. Reflect on the process of filmmaking and the process of working together as a group.

     

    Documentary Film Content

     

    • Film Thesis: A simple and obvious thesis that will set out to explain or prove.
    • Obvious rhetorical strategies: compare/contrast, cause-and-effect, process analysis, etc.

     

    • Evidence: Support any and all claims. Evidence must serve the thesis.
    • Film Structure: Beginning/introduction, middle/evidence, and an end/conclusion.
    • Film Editing: Proof of editing for visual and audio clarity.
    • Film Text: Use of text on the screen. How will you text to help your audience? How will use credits?

     

    Documentary Film Outcomes Checklist:

     

    q  Did your audience learnsomething about your topic?

    q  Was the main point andpurpose of the film obvious?

    q  Was the information clear?

    q  Was there enough informationand evidence?

    q  Was there a definable bias?

    q  What was the process like?

    q  How will you present yourwritten work?

    q  How will you present thefilm?

    q  How seriously did you takethis project?

    q  How well did you work andcommunicate as a group? How many times did you meet in person to plan andexecute this project? Did some group members put much more time into thisproject than others?

     

    Unit 9 Writing Assignments

    • Documentary film proposal: A written proposal that outlines the group’s idea for the film. Must be word-processed and turned in by this Friday or sooner.
    • Documentary film shooting script: Each segment or episode should be planned out before you turn the camera on. How long will each camera shot be, what type of shot will you use, and how will you edit the shots together? Must be word-processed and turned in.
    • Documentary film dialogue script: This is your road map for what you want us to learn or hear from your subjects. What interview questions will you ask and what order will you present the information? Must be word-processed and turned in.
    • Documentary film project reflection:  Complete one word-processed document that contains at least one paragraph of reflection from each person. Reflect on the process of filmmaking and the process of working together as a group.
    • Interactive journal. Try to capture any last minute thoughts about the upcoming exam. Are there any gaps in your knowledge? What have you gained from this class? Skills

     

    Unit 9

    • AP practice exam and answer analysis: Synthesis Prompt II. In-class timed write, read aloud, peer-edit, take home and re-write (on word-processor), write reflective paragraph about what you changed and why.

     

    THIS SYLLABUS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

     

     

    AP Language andComposition Bibliography                                       

     

    1. SummerReading Texts

     

    Strunk, William, and White, E.B. The Elements of Style. 4th ed.Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon, 2000. 

     

    The Best AmericanEssays of the Century. Edited by Joyce Carol Oates and, Robert Atwan. NewYork: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.

     

    Essays included in this text:

    1901: Mark Twain, Corn-poneOpinons

    1903: W.E.B. Du Bois, Ofthe Coming of John

    1906: Henry Adams, ALaw of Acceleration

    1909: John Muir, Stickeen

    1910: William James, TheMoral Equivalent of War

    1911: Randolph Bourne, TheHandicapped

    1912: John Jay Chapman, Coatesville

    1916: Jane Addams, TheDevil Baby at Hull-House

    1919: T.S. Eliot, Traditionand the Individual Talent

    1923: Ernest Hemingway, Pamplonain July

    1925: H.L. Mencken, TheHills of Zion

    1928: Zora Neale Hurston, How It Feels to Be Colored Me

    1933: Edmund Wilson, TheOld Stone House

    1935: Gertrude Stein, WhatAre Masterpieces and Why Are There So Few of Them

    1936: F. Scott Fitgerald, The Crack-Up

    1937: James Thurber, SexEx Machina

    1937: Richard Wright, TheEthics of Living Jim Crow: An Autobiographical Sketch

    1938: James Agee, Knoxville:Summer of 1915

    1939: Robert Frost, TheFigure a Poem Makes

    1941: E.B. White, OnceMore to the Lake

    1944: S.J. Perelman, InsertFlap “A” an Throw Away

    1949: Langston Hughes, Bop

    1950: Katherine Anne Porter, The Future is Now

    1955: Rachel Carson, TheMarginal World

    1955: James Baldwin, Notesof a Native Son

    1956: Loren Eiseley, TheBrown Wasps

    1957: Eudora Welty, ASweet Devouring

    1961: Donald Hall, AHundred Thousand Straightened Nails

    1963: Martin Luther King, Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail

    1964: Tom Wolfe, PuttingDaddy On

    1964: Susan Sontag, Noteson “Camp”

    1966: Vladimir Nabokov, PerfectPast

    1967: N. Scott Momaday, TheWay to Rainy Mountain

    1968: Elizabeth Hardwick, The Apotheosis of Martin Luther King

    1969: Michael Herr, IlluminationRounds

    1970: Maya Angelou, IKnow Why the Caged Bird Sings

    1971: Lewis Thomas, TheLives of a Cell

    1972: John McPhee, TheSearch for Marvin Gardens

    1972: William H. Gass, TheDoomed in Their Sinking

    1975: Maxine Hong Kingston, No Name Woman

    1975: Alice Walker, Lookingfor Zora

    1977: Adrienne Rich, Womenand Honor: Some Notes on Lying

    1979: Joan Didion, TheWhite Album

    1980: Richard Rodriguez, Aria:A Memoir of a Bilingual Childhood

    1981: Gretel Ehrlich, TheSolace of Open Spaces

    1982: Annie Dillard, TotalEclipse

    1982: Cynthia Ozick, ADrugstore in Winter

    1987: William Manchester, Okinawa: The Bloodiest Battle of All

    1988: Edward Hoagland, Heavenand Nature

    1989: Stephen Jay Gould, TheCreation Myths of Cooperstown

    1990: Gerald Early, Lifewith Daughters: Watching the Miss America Pageant

    1993: John Updike, TheDisposable Rocket

    1995: Joyce Carol Oates, TheyAll Just Went Away

    1997: Saul Bellow, GravenImages

     

    2. CourseTexts

     

    Alexie, Sherman. TheLone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven.

     

    Atwood, Margaret. TheHandmaid’s Tale.

     

    Baker, Russell. GrowingUp. New York: Penguin Group, 1982.

     

    Baldwin, James. TheFire Next Time. New York: Dell Publishing Co., 1963.

     

    Corwin, Miles. AndStill We Rise.

     

    Didion, Joan. TheWhite Album. New York: Washington Square Press, 1979.

     

    Harr, Jonathan. ACivil Action. New York: Random House, Inc., 1996.

     

    Kernan, Alvin. InPlato’s Cave.

     

    Lightman, Alan. Einstein’sDreams. New York: Random House Inc., 1993.

     

    Steinbeck, John. Travelswith Charley. New York: Bantam Books, 1975. 

     

    Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five.New York: Random House, Inc., 1969.

     

    Wolff, Tobias. ThisBoy’s Life. New York: Grove Press, 1989.

     

    Woolf, Virginia. ARoom of One’s Own. New York: Harcourt, Inc., 1929.

     

    3. CourseSupplemental Texts

     

    The Compact Reader,Short Essays by Method and Theme. 6th ed. Edtited by Jane E.Aaron. Boston: Bedford, St. Martin’s, 1999.

     

    The Essay Connection.4th ed. Edited by Lynn Z. Bloom. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath andCompany, 1995.

     

    The Little, BrownReader. 8th ed. Edited by Marcia Stubbs and Sylvan Barnet. NewYork: Longman, 2000.

     

    The Norton Sampler.4th ed. Edited by Thomas Cooley. New York: W.W. Norton &Company, 1993.

     

    The Prentice HallReader. 6th ed. Edited by George Miller. Upper Saddle River, NJ:Prentice Hall, Inc., 2001.

     

    Sample Assignment1: A Civil Action Assignment fromNature/Environment Unit

     

    A Civil Action Assignment       Name:                                                                                     

    You will write three separate essays, twoexpository, one analytical, and you will create one brief oral argument. Eachessay doesn’t need to be a full-blown tome, but it needs to have substance andit needs to be clear. Ranting for three pages is not acceptable. This isanalysis, not unsupported runaway opinion. Proofread for clarity, flow, andcommon errors. Provide a bibliography as needed and cite your sources usingproper MLA format. Include all notes and source material when you turn in yourfinal packet of work for this unit.

     

    This is not the only work you will do forthe next four weeks. You will read and respond to several nature/environmentalessays and you will begin to practice for the AP exam as it gets closer. Wewill discuss a third of A Civil Actionper week for the next three weeks. Brief quizzes about the book are likely eachweek. Do not wait to crack open your books for weeks, then read this relativelythick book in a panic, or scan Sparknotes.com, and throw together some hastilywritten essays. Read the book, take notes, bring in each essay the nextconsecutive three Thursdays for peer-editing and teacher editing (always bringtwo copies, one for me and one for your peer editor), and then prepare to makea formal argument to re-open the case from the podium on the day you willpresent.

     

    Essay I

     

    COURTROOM DRAMA: TRUTH, JUSTICE,RHETORIC, AND THE LAW

    Write a clear and cohesive 750-word expository essay,supported with direct evidence and outside source information as needed. Inthis section you must explore and analyze the law, the trial, and all of theparties as they argued their side of the case as detailed in A Civil Action.

     

    QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

    What is a civil action? What is personal injury law? Whatare the goals of the plaintiff and the defendant? What is the jury’s role? Howmuch power does a judge have over the trial’s outcome? How do lawyers researchand build their cases? How do they argue their cases in front of the judge andjury? How important are eyewitnesses and experts who offer their testimony? Howimportant is money in mounting and sustaining a case? How important is the keyissue (dead children and sick people) in this particular case? Is this caseindicative of the entire legal system? Do you have any outside examples (O.J.)?How important is the pride and ego of the lawyers trying the case? Howimportant is fame, fortune, and setting an historical precedent? Are legalethics a priority for everyone in the case? Do people lie? What role do thefacts and the truth have in the outcome of the case?

     

     

    Essay II

     

    WRITING THE BOOK: STRUCTURE,METHODS, AND WRITING STRATEGIES

    In this section you need to craft a 750-word analyticalessay that explores and details the literary style, technique, and structurefound in A Civil Action. Identifywhat Harr was doing to his reader and explain why he did it. Your structuralanalysis should be very specific and you must use terminology to identify thetechnique(s) you detail. Always support your analysis with direct evidence fromthe text.

     

    QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

    What is journalistic style? How objective is this reportage?What privileges was Harr afforded as an author? How did he translate, organize,and simplify complicated information and convoluted plot twists for his reader?How did he approach the passage of time? How did he portray the real-lifecharacters so that we knew them? How did the author use sensory detail tocreate drama, mood, and tone? How did Harr control the pace of the book usingsyntax and paragraph length? How did he use dialogue?

     

    Essay III

     

    FOLLOW-UP AND DISCOVERY: WHAT ELSEDO YOU KNOW?

    Create a clear and cohesive 750-word research essay thatexplores outside information about the case, information that is beyond thescope of the book. Research the effects of this case and create a strong paperthat has a clear focus. Your job is to inform and educate. The evidence yougather must fit together and the essay should flow smoothly from paragraph toparagraph.

     

    QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

    What effect has the case and writing this book had on theauthor? What was the effect of the book/film on the public? What impact has thecase had on current environmental law? What is the follow-up story about thepeople of Woburn? What happened to the families? What is Jan Schlichtmann doingnow? Has the case proven to be a landmark event in legal history or justanother sad story of corporations skirting responsibility? Do any of thelawyers regret working on this case? Is environmental law a growing field oflaw? What is happening in personal injury law? Is the government expanding orlimiting the ability to hold corporations responsible for personal injury? Dosome Americans take advantage of the courts for their personal gain?

     

    Part IV

     

    MAKE AN ORAL ARGUMENT/MOTION TO RE-OPEN THE CASE.

    You have three minutes to argue your case. You must also write your oral argument in aclear, concise, persuasive essay. Think about what was discovered after thesettlement and what the EPA found after further investigation. Use informationthat you found while doing research for your other essays for this assignment.Why should the legal system take the time and money to re-open or re-try a casethat spent so many years in the courts? You will be speaking directly to us,but pretend you are speaking to Judge Skinner and the same defense team. Beconcise and use the best information you can gather to make your case. You mayuse information you find from Section III. Your delivery and style are veryimportant. Be loud, be clear, have notes if you need them. Do not read directlyfrom the page.

     

    QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

    What is the format of an oral argument? How do you approachyour speech? How will you start? What kinds of appeals will you make, knowinghow the judge has reacted during the case? What information is most important,given the limited amount of time you have? How convincing is your argument? Arethere any holes? What kind of reaction and criticism can you expect?

     

    Sample Assignment2: AP Literary Terms Quiz (#11)

     

    AP Literary Terms Quiz #11               Name:                                                                         

     


    q  Point of view

    q  Premise

    q  Process Analysis

    q  Prose

    q  Protagonist

    q  Proposition

    q  Purpose

    q  Rational appeal

    q  Realism

    q  Repetition and Restatement



    1. __________________________________

    “If we get too many more murdererslike Robert Lee Massie or Timothy McVeigh, we’ll have to ratchet up thebarbarity of our extermination methods to ensure that we continue to receivejustice through capital punishment.

                That is why We The People execute men andwomen, isn’t it? So “justice” can be done? Justice for the victims. For theirheartbroken and grieving loved ones. For society in general, which so revereslife, and views murder as such an abomination that we kill to prove it.

                It’s aboutgetting even, yes?

                Or at leasttrying to get even. We know that nothing really evens the score; nothing canbring the victim back from the dead; nothing can make society whole.

                So, in thename of justice, we choose two minuses instead of one. We create a second setof heartbroken, grieving loved ones. We respond to the shortcomings of ourculture – the mental illness, drug addiction, pathological alienation, rage,ignorance, childhood abuse or DNA – by stopping its heart and shutting itsmouth, forever.

                Whichbrings us back to Massie and McVeigh.

                How can WeThe People try to get even with killers who want us to execute them? How can weexact justice from men who won’t fight to the very end to stay alive? Whatsatisfaction can possibly be gained from such willing participants?

                Massie, atwo-time killer on Death Row for 30 years, even tried to make it easier forprison guards to insert the intravenous needles that would carry his chemicalticket to oblivion: He pumped his fist to enlarge his veins.

                Massie wentexactly as he wanted to go, with exactly the attitude he’d carried since hisfirst murder in 1965; he was unremorseful, unapologetic and unrepentant.

                Where’s thejustice? Where’s the getting even?

                Because wecannot kill a killer more than once (no matter how many lives he may havetaken), we ought to do the closest thing: kill him as brutally, mercilessly andbloodily as we know how.

                Ourdefinition of justice demands it.” 

     

    Stephanie Salter, Let’s Get Serious About Killing

     

    1. A. Define purpose:

     

     

                B. Determine the purpose of StephanieSalter’s essay:

               

     

     

    3. __________________________________

    “Accompanied by a plague of robins,Sula came back to Medallion. The little yam-breasted shuddering birds wereeverywhere, exciting very small children away from their usual welcome into avicious stoning. Nobody knew why or from where they had come. What they didknow was that you couldn’t go anywhere without stepping in their pearly shit,and it was hard to hang up clothes, pull weeds or just sit on the front porchwhen robins were flying and dying all around.”                               ToniMorrison, Sula

     

    4.___________________________________

    A literarymovement that began in the 19th century in the United States thatportrayed common people doing commonthings. Mark Twain’s writing is the chief example of this type of writing.Early in the 20th century dramatic plays took on this specificstyle, with the most notable plays being OurTown and Death of a Salesman.

     

    5.______________________________________

    The firstsentence is what part of these equations?  

     

    The roof always leaks when it rains.

    It is raining.

    Therefore, theroof will leak.

     

    The state hospitals’ treatment of chronicpatients relies exclusively on drugs.

    Drugs do notcure chronic patients.

    Therefore, thestate hospitals’ treatment of chronic patients will not cure them.

     

    6.______________________________________

     “Once we were home I’d watch my Pops comb hishair. I would sit on the counter and hold his Pomade jar in one hand and hislittle black pocket comb in the other. He would drape a towel around hisshoulder, then partially wet hishair with hands. Next, he would combit straight back. After that, hewould stick his three middle fingers in the Pomade jar and scoop the goop. Hewould slap his hands together and run it through his hair. Finally, he would comb the grease into his hair, spreading itevenly. The Pomade worked perfectly to hold each and every strand of hair down.The outcome would be a shiny,slicked back, neat hairstyle. Afterwards, he would wipe his comb and place itin his Ben Davis shirt pocket, right next to his eyeglass pouch.”

    Monica Haena, Delta Winds

     

    7._________________________________________

    Men remember receiving little mercy asboys; maybe that’s why it’s sometimes difficult for them to show any.

    I know lots of men who had happychildhoods, but none who have happy memories of the way other boys treatedthem,” says a friend. “It’s a macho marathon from the third grade up, when you start butting each other in thestomach.”

    You don’t need to be a shrink to see how thelessons boys learn affect theirbehavior as men. Men are being asked, more and more, to show sensitivity, but they dread the very word.”

    Jon Katz, How Boys Become Men

     

    8. _______________________________________

    “Duringthe years of beatings by her mother, years of being whipped with an extensioncord, smacked in the mouth with a telephone, pounded against a wall, punched inthe lip, dragged by the hair through the hallway, tossed in the shower, andscalded with hot water, school was Olivia’s salvation. The only kind words sheheard, the only love she felt, the only compliments she received, were from herteachers. At home, no matter how she was tormented, no matter how long she cried,when the beatings were over, she always read her assignments, and prepared forher tests.

                Olivia had always excelled in schooland was always one of the brightest students in her class. And the A’s shestrived for and always received enabled her to find a glimmer of happiness andhope during an abysmal childhood.”

    Miles Corwin, from: Prologue, Olivia -- And Still We Rise, The Trialsand Triumphs of Twelve Gifted Inner-City Students (South Central LosAngeles)

     

    9._______________________________________

    “It is a melancholy objectto those who walk through this great town or travel in the country, when theysee the streets, the roads, and cabin doors, crowded with beggars of the femalesex, followed by three, four, or six children, all in rags and importuningevery passenger for an alms (offering). These mothers, instead of being able towork for their honest livelihood, are force to employ all their time instrolling to beg sustenance for their helpless infants; who as they grow upeither turn thieves for want of work, or leave their dear native country (orIreland) to fight for the pretender in Spain, or sell themselves (as slaves) tothe Barbadoes.

    I shall now thereforehumbly propose my own thoughts, which I hope will not be liable to the leastobjection.

    I have been assured by avery knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy childwell nursed at a year old the most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food,whether stewed, roasted, baked, or broiled; and I make no doubt that it willequally serve in a fricassee or a ragout.

    I do therefore humbly offerit to public consideration that of the 120,000 children already computed,20,000 may be reserved for breed, wherof only one-fourth part to be males;which is more than we allow to sheep, black cattle, or swine; and my reason is,that these children are seldom the fruits of marriage, a circumstance not muchregarded by our savages; therefore one male will be sufficient to serve fourfemales. That the remaining 100,000 may, at a year old, be offered in sale tothe persons of quality and fortune throughout the kingdom; always advising themother to let them suck plentifully in the last month, so as to render themplump and fat for a good table. A child will make two dishes at an entertainmentfor friends; and when the family dines alone, the fore or hind quarter willmake a reasonable dish, and seasoned with a little pepper or sold will be verygood boiled on the fourth day, especially in winter.”

    JonathanSwift, 1729

     

    10. ______________________________________

    “There were tanks that had onlyjust make the beach before beings knocked out. There were jeeps that had burnedto a dull gray. There were big derricks on caterpillar treads that didn’t quitemake it. There were half-tracks carrying office equipment that had been madeinto a shambles by a single shell hit, their interiors still holding theuseless equipage of smashed typewriters, telephones, office files.”

    Ernie Pyle, On World War II

     

    Sample Assignment3: Modern Historical Snapshot and Joan Didion’s The White Album

     

    The60s and 70s Group Research Project

     

    Topics

    Become an expert on a provided topic and connect the cultureof the times to Joan Didion’s book TheWhite Album. Your research projects must support and connect to this text,and your research must highlight the era of the 60s and early 70s in order tooffer a better understanding of the era Didion captures throughout her book.Why was this time in recent history unique? Help us understand the atmosphereof the 60s and 70s so that The WhiteAlbum makes a more sense to you, me, and your audience.

     

    Collaboration

    Get on the phone with one another to plan your project andto divide the work equally. Generate a focus and plan what you will present tous (in 15 minutes) and how you will present it. Your audience will include: theTeam Program students, the principal, other teachers, and parents. I willrevise and edit your work, and you must provide a proposal of what you plan todo two weeks prior to the presentation. Your level of collaboration andcontribution to this group project will be assessed by you and by me throughyour feedback and reflection and by my observations of the process and theproduct.

     

    Visual Aid Choices

    I expect to see film and television clips, to hearrecordings of speeches and music, to see photographs and artwork, to hearpoetry and prose read aloud, or to see an interpretive dance. You may deliversome of most of these images using the computer and a Powerpoint presentationor a slide show to help you create an organized and cohesive visualpresentation. Each of the topics must follow .

    You cannot use: posters, poster board, foam core posterboard, tri-fold poster board, stick drawings on the classroom white board, 81/2 x 11 inch handouts, pages printed from the internet, brochures, pamphlets,photographs passed around, collage, or anything else that is remotely similarto a poster. No posters.

     

    Specific Assignmentsfor The White Album

     

    1. Define each of the 425 vocabulary words for this book from the list I have provided. The list is separated by each chapter, with an ALL-CAPITALS title for each chapter. Word-process your list and do it before you read the book so that you can use the definitions as a valuable reference guide. I will check this list at the next class meeting.

     

    1. Read the book. Take notes as you go. You must consider your research project as you read. Turn in your notes (handwritten or word-processed) with your expository essays.

     

    1. Prepare an expository essay for each individual topic. Write an essay that exposes and explains the nine topics. Limit yourselves to two or three pages per topic and make clear connections to The White Album. Divide the work evenly. Use adequate evidence and cite your sources according to MLA style. This essay must inform and educate, not pontificate. Bring three copies of your rough drafts into class in two weeks for peer and teacher editing. We will use the peer editing checklist.

     

    1. Prepare a 15-minute presentation for each of your three topics. Each person must speak and you must have evidence to show us. Since this is an oral and visual presentation, you must provide your audience with enough evidence to explain your topic. Do not assume your audience knows anything: explain everything clearly and completely. Decide how you will share the information. No posters. See above. I will use the district outcome speaking certificate rubric for speaking skills and visual aids. You must provide me with a presentation outline for each topic one week before the presentations.

     

    1. Write a 200-word reflection about this project. (Paragraph 1) Share specific difficulties and successes you had experienced while working with your group partners. (Paragraph 2) Explain your research process while preparing for this project. (Paragraph 3) Describe the specific choices you made for the oral presentation and why you made them.

     

    Group Topics

    Group 1: Vietnam, Fashion, and Art

    1. Vietnam: History, reasons, controversies, the draft, protests, Bay Area. 
    2. Fashion and Popular Style: What were people wearing? Or not wearing? What was going on with hair? What was going on with consumer products? Is there a definitive style to the stuff that people bought in the 60s and 70s?
    3. Art: What was happening in the art scene? Why? Who were the key players?

     

    Group 2:  Government, Protests, andLiterature

    1.    The Civil Rights Movement: The South, Watts, TheOlympics, gay rights, legislation, women’s rights, etc.

    1. Politics: Who was in charge? What happened? What was the economy doing?
    2. Literature: Journalism, non-fiction, fiction, comic books (e.g., R. Crumb and Zap Comix), poetry, eccentric authors, book banning, etc.

     

    Group 3:  The Media and Pop Culture

    1.     Television:News, violence, Vietnam, sitcoms, fashion, politics, humor, censorship.

    1. Film: What was popular? What wasn’t?  Was film an important medium to carry the other messages of the day?

    3.     Music:What was happening in the 60s and 70s that had an impact on popular music? Whatwere the seminal events?

    And remember, no posters.

     

Last Modified on January 7, 2013