•  Rainbows and Unicorns
    Google Classroom Codes
     
    American Government/ Economics Period 1  ahp6o4d
     
    U.S. History Period 2 ofk87ua
     
    U.S. History Period 3 w39bupm
     
    American Government/ Economics Period 5 p76d77g
     
    U.S. History Period 6 bup25ye
     
Mr. Jacob Powell

Phone: 415-945-3770 x 7014

Email:

Degrees and Certifications:

Graduated Humboldt State University in 1994 with a B.A. in History and a B.A. in Social Science Teacher Preparation with a minor in Geography Received a Clear Credential in Social Science with a supplemental authorization in English from Chapman University in 2002

Mr. Jacob Powell

I have been teaching history and English for twenty years. I started my teaching career in Southern California where I taught 7th and 8th grade history for five years. In 2002 I moved to Costa Rica where I taught 7th and 9th graders at a dual immersion high school.

For the past twelve years I taught at a Charter School in Alameda CA. This Charter School was based on a democratic model of education. I really enjoyed this unique model of education where the students are empowered to create their own school culture and responsible for school discipline. The students serve on a jury and they hold their fellow learners accountable for rules that are broken and to help in peer mediation.

I am very excited to be teaching history at San Andreas. I started my career working in alternative education with the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools at Mission Community School, in my hometown of Redlands, Ca. I believe that my experiences in education will help create a vibrant social science program here at San Andreas High School. The staff and students have been very welcoming and I appreciate all of the help I have been getting to begin this new phase of my educational career.

 

  • Syllabus

    U.S History Reconstruction - The Great Recession

     

    Text: The Americans

     

    History is an argument about the past.
    Constructing a narrative about history involves several tasks:
    • Analyzing Primary Sources
    • Examining Source Information
    • Reading Multiple Perspectives and Accounts
    • Using Evidence to Support Claims
    • Understanding Historical Context

    Historians use evidence to construct a story or interpretation about the past, and often that evidence is fragmentary, partial or conflicting. A careful historian asks critical questions about her or his evidence and acknowledges the potential strengths and weaknesses of those sources for constructing plausible stories (histories) about the past. Historians make knowledge rather than just consume it.

    Course Description:   You will study broad themes in the history of modern America, including immigration, race and ethnicity, social and political reform, mobility and population growth, contested meanings of freedom, industrialization, cycles of prosperity and recession, popular culture, modernity and rights movements.

    You will improve your ability to think historically through critical analysis of primary and secondary sources; set events, documents and people in their historical contexts; and craft your own interpretations and historical narratives from the “raw material” of the past. If your past experience in history courses involved a lot of memorization of facts and dates, then you will find this course to be very different – most of the time you will be busy actively doing history, not passively learning about history.

     

    WHY STUDY HISTORY? THE VALUE OF THINKING HISTORICALLY I’ll be blunt. You cannot understand the world we live in without learning history, and you cannot meaningfully contribute to this nation as a citizen and/or resident without knowing how it came to be the way it is. So the study of recent history, especially, should be an important part of anyone’s education. But aside from the course content, by learning to DO (and not just study about) history for yourself, you will strengthen skills essential to your future no matter what your interests: communication, writing, critical thinking, and analysis.

    Respect for Diversity: It is my intent that students from all diverse backgrounds and perspectives be well-served by this course, that students' learning needs be addressed both in and out of class, and that the diversity that students bring to this class be viewed as a resource, strength and benefit. It is my intent to present materials and activities that are respectful of diversity: gender, sexual orientation, disability, age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, race, culture, perspective, and other background characteristics. Your suggestions about how to improve the value of diversity in this course are encouraged and appreciated. Please let me know ways to improve the effectiveness of the course for you personally or for other students or student groups.

     

    A word about class discussion: Classroom discussion is important and valued in this class. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but we must express ourselves within the bounds of courtesy, sensitivity, and respect. Please share your thoughts and be willing to listen to perspectives that may differ from your own. - S. Hansen

     

    Attendance/Tardy Policy:

     

    Tardies and absences directly impact a student’s credit earning potential:

     

    0-4 absences = 2 credits

    5-6 absences = 1.5 credits

    7-8 absences = 1 credit

    9-10 absences = .5 credit

    11+ absences = 0 credit

     

    3 tardies = 1 absence

     

    Difference between Credits and Grades: Grades are earned based on the quality of work a student completes when they are present. Credits are earned based on the amount of time a student is present in class.

     

    Independent Study Contracts: Any student earning credit beyond 2 credits for a course must have an independent study contract on file. All independent study courses a student is taking must have an independent study contract on file. Signatures are required by the teacher, student, counselor, and admin.

     

    Students Leaving Class: Only one student is allowed out of class at a time for bathroom/water breaks.


    Inappropriate Language/Conversations: I will always intervene when a student is disrespectful towards another student, talking about drugs, or using disrespectful language. Situations that are excessive or need additional support will be referred to Greg or David.

  • Syllabus

    American Government Syllabus

     

    Text:  Magruder’s American Government

     

    History is an argument about the past.
    Constructing a narrative about history involves several tasks:
    • Analyzing Primary Sources
    • Examining Source Information
    • Reading Multiple Perspectives and Accounts
    • Using Evidence to Support Claims
    • Understanding Historical Context

    Historians use evidence to construct a story or interpretation about the past, and often that evidence is fragmentary, partial or conflicting. A careful historian asks critical questions about her or his evidence and acknowledges the potential strengths and weaknesses of those sources for constructing plausible stories (histories) about the past. Historians make knowledge rather than just consume it.

    Course Description:

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the nature of government, its theoretical foundations and functions.
    2. Relate American and global political thought, the Constitution, and governing       institutions to one another.
    3. Identify and explain the structures and functions of government prescribed by the Constitution.
    4. Compare and contrast the federal, state and local governments with respect to their their political foundations, functions, and contemporary problems.
    5. Assess the relationship between individuals and the state with emphasis on political objectives, rights and liberties.
    6. Analyze the American political process, including the development of ideologies, voting behavior and other forms of political participation.
    7. Evaluate the relationship between the governing process and public policy.
    8. Explain how the American system affects their lives in terms of freedoms and restraints.
    9. Situate the American system within a world characterized by globalization.
    10. Utilize the knowledge gained to become engaged with the American political process.

    Respect for Diversity: It is my intent that students from all diverse backgrounds and perspectives be well-served by this course, that students' learning needs be addressed both in and out of class, and that the diversity that students bring to this class be viewed as a resource, strength and benefit. It is my intent to present materials and activities that are respectful of diversity: gender, sexual orientation, disability, age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, race, culture, perspective, and other background characteristics. Your suggestions about how to improve the value of diversity in this course are encouraged and appreciated. Please let me know ways to improve the effectiveness of the course for you personally or for other students or student groups.

     

    A word about class discussion: Classroom discussion is important and valued in this class. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but we must express ourselves within the bounds of courtesy, sensitivity, and respect. Please share your thoughts and be willing to listen to perspectives that may differ from your own. - S. Hansen

     

    Attendance/Tardy Policy:

     

    Tardies and absences directly impact a student’s credit earning potential:

     

    0-4 absences = 2 credits

    5-6 absences = 1.5 credits

    7-8 absences = 1 credit

    9-10 absences = .5 credit

    11+ absences = 0 credit

     

    3 tardies = 1 absence

     

    Difference between Credits and Grades: Grades are earned based on the quality of work a student completes when they are present. Credits are earned based on the amount of time a student is present in class.

     

    Independent Study Contracts: Any student earning credit beyond 2 credits for a course must have an independent study contract on file. All independent study courses a student is taking must have an independent study contract on file. Signatures are required by the teacher, student, counselor, and admin.

     

    Students Leaving Class: Only one student is allowed out of class at a time for bathroom/water breaks.


    Inappropriate Language/Conversations: I will always intervene when a student is disrespectful towards another student, talking about drugs, or using disrespectful language. Situations that are excessive or need additional support will be referred to Greg or David.

  • The intellectual skills noted below are to be learned through, and applied to, the content standards. In addition to the standards for grades nine through twelve, students demonstrate the following intellectual, reasoning, reflection, and research skills.

    Chronological and Spatial Thinking

    1. Students compare the present with the past, evaluating the consequences of past events and decisions and determining the lessons that were learned.

    2. Students analyze how change happens at different rates at different times; understand that some aspects can change while others remain the same; and understand that change is complicated and affects not only technology and politics but also values and beliefs.

    3. Students use a variety of maps and documents to interpret human movement, including major patterns of domestic and international migration, changing environmental preferences and settlement patterns, the frictions that develop between population groups, and the diffusion of ideas, technological innovations, and goods.

    4. Students relate current events to the physical and human characteristics of places and regions.

    Historical Research, Evidence, and Point of View

    1. Students distinguish valid arguments from fallacious arguments in historical interpretations.

    2. Students identify bias and prejudice in historical interpretations.

    3. Students evaluate major debates among historians concerning alternative interpretations of the past, including an analysis of authors’ use of evidence and the distinctions between sound generalizations and misleading oversimplifications.

    4. Students construct and test hypotheses; collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary sources; and apply it in oral and written presentations.

    Historical Interpretation

    1. Students show the connections, causal and otherwise, between particular historical events and larger social, economic, and political trends and developments.

    2. Students recognize the complexity of historical causes and effects, including the limitations on determining cause and effect.

    3. Students interpret past events and issues within the context in which an event unfolded rather than solely in terms of present-day norms and values.

    4. Students understand the meaning, implication, and impact of historical events and recognize that events could have taken other directions.

    5. Students analyze human modifications of landscapes and examine the resulting environmental policy issues. 6. Students conduct cost-benefit analyses and apply basic economic indicators to analyze the aggregate economic behavior of the U.S. economy.